Tag Archives: window

HONK if you’re Amish – 3 3/4″ x 5″- funny die cut vinyl decal / sticker for window, truck, car, laptop, etc

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List Price: $ 9.99

Price: $ 4.99

Window at the Old Falls Church

Window at the Old Falls Church
Church names
Image by Kathleen Tyler Conklin

The first church to be built after it was established by the Colonial General Assembly in 1732 was a wooden building on this site as a part of Truro Parish . It was completed in 1734 by Richard Blackburn on land donated by John Trammell. Until that time, this area was served by clergyman who lived near present-day Quantico, and the nearest church was Occoquan Church near Lorton.

The name "The Falls Church" came from its geographical location. Among the very few, widely separated churches in the parish, this church was identified as the one that was "near the falls" of the Potomac River. One of the roads which intersected near the church led to the ferry below the Little Falls. The Falls Church was the name commonly used after 1757. The name Falls Church was adopted by the community which developed around the church, and subsequently by the city when it was incorporated in 1948.

In 1762, the wood building was judged to be "greatly in decay". The vestry (the church governing body), meeting at The Falls Church, ordered a new brick building constructed on the same site. In 1763, George Washington and George William Fairfax were appointed church wardens with responsibility to contract for a new building. This was Washington’s last official act on behalf of this church after the parish was divided in 1765 and before work began. After 1765, the seat of Truro Parish, which had been here, returned to the southern part of the county and this church became the seat of the new Fairfax Parish.

Work on the new church was begun in 1767 by Colonel James Wren who had designed the building and was a member of the vestry as well. The new building was completed late in the fall of 1769. It is the oldest remaining church building north of Quantico in Virginia.

Detail of an Edward Burne-Jones window at Historic Second Church

Detail of an Edward Burne-Jones window at Historic Second Church
Church furniture
Image by yooperann
One of a pair of gorgeous stained glass windows by Edward Burne-Jones of the William Morris & Co studios. The windows were included in a 1902 "Morris Memorial Room" at the Tobey Furniture Company in Chicago. A church member named Franklin Gray purchased them for 2nd Presbyterian.

This is St. Margaret, the patron saint of childbirth.

Friends of Historic Second Church

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Trinity Church’s stained glass collection is one of the finest in the nation with examples from most of the major American and European stained glass stuios of the nineteenth century. With the exception of one window, the church contained only clear glass windows at tits consecration. Twenty four figurative windows followed within five years. Today thirty-six windows line the walls of Trinity church, including four designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris and another four designed by John La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Trinity Church’s stained glass collection is one of the finest in the nation with examples from most of the major American and European stained glass stuios of the nineteenth century. With the exception of one window, the church contained only clear glass windows at tits consecration. Twenty four figurative windows followed within five years. Today thirty-six windows line the walls of Trinity church, including four designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris and another four designed by John La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)