Tag Archives: Virgin

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and statue memorials

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and statue memorials
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
This church on Warwick Road in Acocks Green is St Mary the Virgin. It is the Parish Church of Acocks Green.

It is a Grade II listed building, since July 2009, possibly to help it with renovations (can’t find listing on Heritage Gateway but it is on the Acocks Green History Society’s website).

997/0/10468 WARWICK ROAD

23-JUL-09 Acocks Green

Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin

II

An Anglican parish church in broadly C13 style, designed by J G Bland, dating from 1864-1882 with extensions of 1891-4 by J A Chatwin.

MATERIALS: The church is constructed from two colours of local sandstone, apart from red brick walls to the exterior of the transept arches marking the impact of WWII bombing; the roofs of the main church are of concrete tile, and those of the east ends of the aisles are of slate.

PLAN: The church is orientated north east-south west, though ritual compass points are used throughout this description. The plan has nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north vestry, south organ chamber and north porch.

EXTERIOR: The exterior is of red sandstone with cream sandstone dressings. The long elevations have five bays to the clerestoried nave, and a slightly lower two-bay chancel. The westernmost nave bays have aisle windows of three lights below clusters of trefoils, set into pointed archways with colonnettes with carved capitals including foliage and human heads. The clerestory windows above are paired plain lancets. In place of the transepts are continuations of the aisle in brick, with four lancets. The north porch has a steeply-gabled roof and elaborate Early English doorway with zig-zag and foliate decoration. The north vestry is also gabled, and has a further lean-to vestry with similar windows to those in the nave. The south side is similar but has a flush doorway instead of a porch in the western bay, and a C20 brick extension at the east end. The north and south sides of the chancel each have two tall two-light windows with trefoils above, running full height. The west end has a tall window of paired lancets with cusped decoration and a circular window above, with carved foliate decoration to the spandrels, and a drip mould with zig-zag decoration. Below this is a blind arcade of eight pointed arches carried on colonnettes with composite capitals and a continuous drip mould with zig-zag carving. The east window has Decorated tracery, giving five tall lights, quatrefoils and cinqefoils, and glazed spandrels.

INTERIOR: The interior has whitewashed brick walls above stone arcades. The five-bay arcades are of pointed arches in bands of red and cream sandstone, which spring from short, round piers carried on very high bases, with carved foliate capitals. The nave has an arch-braced collar-rafter roof whose trusses are carried on moulded stone corbels; the chancel roof is a timber barrel vault. The floor of the aisles is of large stone flags, and that to the east end is in polychrome tile. The westernmost bay is screened from the main body of the church by a pierced timber screen. The pews, which, like most of the furnishings were lost in the bombing of the church, have been replaced with chairs. The chancel arch and transept arches spring from slender clustered columns with foliate capitals carved by Bridgman of Lichfield. The interior of the church is dominated by the sumptuous east end. The chancel windows have red and cream banded stone surrounds, and those to the north and south sides are divided by full-height, slender clusters of columns rising to foliate capitals which serve as corbels for the trusses of the roof. A high and elaborate carved alabaster reredos, made in 1903, again by Bridgman of Lichfield, depicts Christ in Majesty, flanked by angels carrying the symbols of the Passion. Matching panels with statues of the Archangels in canopied niches are set to either side of the reredos, and the alabaster carvings are carried around the returns. Above the reredos, in a Decorated window, is a stained glass window from designs by Burne-Jones and Philip Webb, depicting the Crucifixion. The timber altar has painted angels in Pre-Raphaelite style. The altarpiece is carved from Devonshire marble, and has niches to either end housing figures of angels. The font and other furnishings date from after the church’s restoration in the 1950s, including a polygonal timber pulpit with canopy by P B Chatwin.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The church has a LYCH GATE in the west boundary wall of the plot. This has a buttressed sandstone base with a timber superstructure, under a hipped roof with slate covering, surmounted by a cream-coloured terracotta cross. Timber gates are mounted in the gateway.

HISTORY: The Church of St Mary the Virgin was begun in 1864, to designs by J G Bland, as a chapel of ease to St Eadburgha’s in Yardley. The building, consisting of part of the nave, north and south aisles and north porch, was intended to have transepts, chancel, vestries and a south-west tower added at a later date. Subsequent phases of building were dependent on donations, and progressed slowly. The church was consecrated in 1866, and a parish was created in 1867, out of part of the parish of St Eadburgha. In 1878, work to complete the nave began, with the addition of transept arches and chancel arch. From 1891-2, the church was further enlarged, by J A Chatwin, who added the chancel, organ chamber and vestries; the work was not completed until 1894. A stained glass window by Morris and Co to designs by Burne-Jones was added in 1895, in memory of Reverend Frederick Thomas Swinburn, late Vicar of Acock’s Green; it was paid for by his widow. Further stained glass was installed by various other benefactors, including a large west window by Hardman and Co. In 1903, an elaborate alabaster reredos, carved by Bridgman of Lichfield, was added to the east end.

In 1940, the church suffered a direct hit from a large incendiary bomb, which landed at the crossing. The church was badly damaged, with the loss of the roofs, internal furnishings, and most of the stained glass and other decoration. Remarkably, the west window and reredos survived with only minute damage, and the arcades were very little damaged, with the structure remaining sound. The church was repaired, with some modifications, during the 1950s: the steeply-pitched roof was replaced with a shallower roof, and the height of the clerestory increased; the circular clerestory windows were replaced with taller, rectangular windows. New furnishings were donated, including a new font, pulpit and west screen. The transepts and tower were never built.

SOURCES: Carew-Cox, A and Waters, W: Edward Burne-Jones – Stained Glass in Birmingham Churches (1998)

Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire (1966), 143-4

History of the County of Warwick (Victoria County History), Volume 7: City of Birmingham (1964), 391

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

* The original church was a lively composition of 1865 by a recognised regional architect, J G Bland

* This was enhanced by additions by J A Chatwin, the prolific West Midlands church architect, in the 1890s

* Although the church was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940, and the proposed tower and transepts were never added, the church as it stands retains much historic fabric of good quality, and was fully restored in the 1950s

* The damage and losses (of some interest in their own right, for showing the impact of the 1940 Blitz) are outweighed by the survival of the sumptuous and high-quality carved alabaster reredos, and the large stained glass east window, made by Morris and Co from designs by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.

Acocks Green Statutorily listed buildings

Various statues and gravestones in the churchyard of St Mary the Virgin.

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
This church on Warwick Road in Acocks Green is St Mary the Virgin. It is the Parish Church of Acocks Green.

It is a Grade II listed building, since July 2009, possibly to help it with renovations (can’t find listing on Heritage Gateway but it is on the Acocks Green History Society’s website).

997/0/10468 WARWICK ROAD

23-JUL-09 Acocks Green

Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin

II

An Anglican parish church in broadly C13 style, designed by J G Bland, dating from 1864-1882 with extensions of 1891-4 by J A Chatwin.

MATERIALS: The church is constructed from two colours of local sandstone, apart from red brick walls to the exterior of the transept arches marking the impact of WWII bombing; the roofs of the main church are of concrete tile, and those of the east ends of the aisles are of slate.

PLAN: The church is orientated north east-south west, though ritual compass points are used throughout this description. The plan has nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north vestry, south organ chamber and north porch.

EXTERIOR: The exterior is of red sandstone with cream sandstone dressings. The long elevations have five bays to the clerestoried nave, and a slightly lower two-bay chancel. The westernmost nave bays have aisle windows of three lights below clusters of trefoils, set into pointed archways with colonnettes with carved capitals including foliage and human heads. The clerestory windows above are paired plain lancets. In place of the transepts are continuations of the aisle in brick, with four lancets. The north porch has a steeply-gabled roof and elaborate Early English doorway with zig-zag and foliate decoration. The north vestry is also gabled, and has a further lean-to vestry with similar windows to those in the nave. The south side is similar but has a flush doorway instead of a porch in the western bay, and a C20 brick extension at the east end. The north and south sides of the chancel each have two tall two-light windows with trefoils above, running full height. The west end has a tall window of paired lancets with cusped decoration and a circular window above, with carved foliate decoration to the spandrels, and a drip mould with zig-zag decoration. Below this is a blind arcade of eight pointed arches carried on colonnettes with composite capitals and a continuous drip mould with zig-zag carving. The east window has Decorated tracery, giving five tall lights, quatrefoils and cinqefoils, and glazed spandrels.

INTERIOR: The interior has whitewashed brick walls above stone arcades. The five-bay arcades are of pointed arches in bands of red and cream sandstone, which spring from short, round piers carried on very high bases, with carved foliate capitals. The nave has an arch-braced collar-rafter roof whose trusses are carried on moulded stone corbels; the chancel roof is a timber barrel vault. The floor of the aisles is of large stone flags, and that to the east end is in polychrome tile. The westernmost bay is screened from the main body of the church by a pierced timber screen. The pews, which, like most of the furnishings were lost in the bombing of the church, have been replaced with chairs. The chancel arch and transept arches spring from slender clustered columns with foliate capitals carved by Bridgman of Lichfield. The interior of the church is dominated by the sumptuous east end. The chancel windows have red and cream banded stone surrounds, and those to the north and south sides are divided by full-height, slender clusters of columns rising to foliate capitals which serve as corbels for the trusses of the roof. A high and elaborate carved alabaster reredos, made in 1903, again by Bridgman of Lichfield, depicts Christ in Majesty, flanked by angels carrying the symbols of the Passion. Matching panels with statues of the Archangels in canopied niches are set to either side of the reredos, and the alabaster carvings are carried around the returns. Above the reredos, in a Decorated window, is a stained glass window from designs by Burne-Jones and Philip Webb, depicting the Crucifixion. The timber altar has painted angels in Pre-Raphaelite style. The altarpiece is carved from Devonshire marble, and has niches to either end housing figures of angels. The font and other furnishings date from after the church’s restoration in the 1950s, including a polygonal timber pulpit with canopy by P B Chatwin.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The church has a LYCH GATE in the west boundary wall of the plot. This has a buttressed sandstone base with a timber superstructure, under a hipped roof with slate covering, surmounted by a cream-coloured terracotta cross. Timber gates are mounted in the gateway.

HISTORY: The Church of St Mary the Virgin was begun in 1864, to designs by J G Bland, as a chapel of ease to St Eadburgha’s in Yardley. The building, consisting of part of the nave, north and south aisles and north porch, was intended to have transepts, chancel, vestries and a south-west tower added at a later date. Subsequent phases of building were dependent on donations, and progressed slowly. The church was consecrated in 1866, and a parish was created in 1867, out of part of the parish of St Eadburgha. In 1878, work to complete the nave began, with the addition of transept arches and chancel arch. From 1891-2, the church was further enlarged, by J A Chatwin, who added the chancel, organ chamber and vestries; the work was not completed until 1894. A stained glass window by Morris and Co to designs by Burne-Jones was added in 1895, in memory of Reverend Frederick Thomas Swinburn, late Vicar of Acock’s Green; it was paid for by his widow. Further stained glass was installed by various other benefactors, including a large west window by Hardman and Co. In 1903, an elaborate alabaster reredos, carved by Bridgman of Lichfield, was added to the east end.

In 1940, the church suffered a direct hit from a large incendiary bomb, which landed at the crossing. The church was badly damaged, with the loss of the roofs, internal furnishings, and most of the stained glass and other decoration. Remarkably, the west window and reredos survived with only minute damage, and the arcades were very little damaged, with the structure remaining sound. The church was repaired, with some modifications, during the 1950s: the steeply-pitched roof was replaced with a shallower roof, and the height of the clerestory increased; the circular clerestory windows were replaced with taller, rectangular windows. New furnishings were donated, including a new font, pulpit and west screen. The transepts and tower were never built.

SOURCES: Carew-Cox, A and Waters, W: Edward Burne-Jones – Stained Glass in Birmingham Churches (1998)

Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire (1966), 143-4

History of the County of Warwick (Victoria County History), Volume 7: City of Birmingham (1964), 391

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

* The original church was a lively composition of 1865 by a recognised regional architect, J G Bland

* This was enhanced by additions by J A Chatwin, the prolific West Midlands church architect, in the 1890s

* Although the church was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940, and the proposed tower and transepts were never added, the church as it stands retains much historic fabric of good quality, and was fully restored in the 1950s

* The damage and losses (of some interest in their own right, for showing the impact of the 1940 Blitz) are outweighed by the survival of the sumptuous and high-quality carved alabaster reredos, and the large stained glass east window, made by Morris and Co from designs by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.

Acocks Green Statutorily listed buildings

Gravestones and a column with an urn at the top of it.

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
This church on Warwick Road in Acocks Green is St Mary the Virgin. It is the Parish Church of Acocks Green.

It is a Grade II listed building, since July 2009, possibly to help it with renovations (can’t find listing on Heritage Gateway but it is on the Acocks Green History Society’s website).

997/0/10468 WARWICK ROAD

23-JUL-09 Acocks Green

Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin

II

An Anglican parish church in broadly C13 style, designed by J G Bland, dating from 1864-1882 with extensions of 1891-4 by J A Chatwin.

MATERIALS: The church is constructed from two colours of local sandstone, apart from red brick walls to the exterior of the transept arches marking the impact of WWII bombing; the roofs of the main church are of concrete tile, and those of the east ends of the aisles are of slate.

PLAN: The church is orientated north east-south west, though ritual compass points are used throughout this description. The plan has nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north vestry, south organ chamber and north porch.

EXTERIOR: The exterior is of red sandstone with cream sandstone dressings. The long elevations have five bays to the clerestoried nave, and a slightly lower two-bay chancel. The westernmost nave bays have aisle windows of three lights below clusters of trefoils, set into pointed archways with colonnettes with carved capitals including foliage and human heads. The clerestory windows above are paired plain lancets. In place of the transepts are continuations of the aisle in brick, with four lancets. The north porch has a steeply-gabled roof and elaborate Early English doorway with zig-zag and foliate decoration. The north vestry is also gabled, and has a further lean-to vestry with similar windows to those in the nave. The south side is similar but has a flush doorway instead of a porch in the western bay, and a C20 brick extension at the east end. The north and south sides of the chancel each have two tall two-light windows with trefoils above, running full height. The west end has a tall window of paired lancets with cusped decoration and a circular window above, with carved foliate decoration to the spandrels, and a drip mould with zig-zag decoration. Below this is a blind arcade of eight pointed arches carried on colonnettes with composite capitals and a continuous drip mould with zig-zag carving. The east window has Decorated tracery, giving five tall lights, quatrefoils and cinqefoils, and glazed spandrels.

INTERIOR: The interior has whitewashed brick walls above stone arcades. The five-bay arcades are of pointed arches in bands of red and cream sandstone, which spring from short, round piers carried on very high bases, with carved foliate capitals. The nave has an arch-braced collar-rafter roof whose trusses are carried on moulded stone corbels; the chancel roof is a timber barrel vault. The floor of the aisles is of large stone flags, and that to the east end is in polychrome tile. The westernmost bay is screened from the main body of the church by a pierced timber screen. The pews, which, like most of the furnishings were lost in the bombing of the church, have been replaced with chairs. The chancel arch and transept arches spring from slender clustered columns with foliate capitals carved by Bridgman of Lichfield. The interior of the church is dominated by the sumptuous east end. The chancel windows have red and cream banded stone surrounds, and those to the north and south sides are divided by full-height, slender clusters of columns rising to foliate capitals which serve as corbels for the trusses of the roof. A high and elaborate carved alabaster reredos, made in 1903, again by Bridgman of Lichfield, depicts Christ in Majesty, flanked by angels carrying the symbols of the Passion. Matching panels with statues of the Archangels in canopied niches are set to either side of the reredos, and the alabaster carvings are carried around the returns. Above the reredos, in a Decorated window, is a stained glass window from designs by Burne-Jones and Philip Webb, depicting the Crucifixion. The timber altar has painted angels in Pre-Raphaelite style. The altarpiece is carved from Devonshire marble, and has niches to either end housing figures of angels. The font and other furnishings date from after the church’s restoration in the 1950s, including a polygonal timber pulpit with canopy by P B Chatwin.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The church has a LYCH GATE in the west boundary wall of the plot. This has a buttressed sandstone base with a timber superstructure, under a hipped roof with slate covering, surmounted by a cream-coloured terracotta cross. Timber gates are mounted in the gateway.

HISTORY: The Church of St Mary the Virgin was begun in 1864, to designs by J G Bland, as a chapel of ease to St Eadburgha’s in Yardley. The building, consisting of part of the nave, north and south aisles and north porch, was intended to have transepts, chancel, vestries and a south-west tower added at a later date. Subsequent phases of building were dependent on donations, and progressed slowly. The church was consecrated in 1866, and a parish was created in 1867, out of part of the parish of St Eadburgha. In 1878, work to complete the nave began, with the addition of transept arches and chancel arch. From 1891-2, the church was further enlarged, by J A Chatwin, who added the chancel, organ chamber and vestries; the work was not completed until 1894. A stained glass window by Morris and Co to designs by Burne-Jones was added in 1895, in memory of Reverend Frederick Thomas Swinburn, late Vicar of Acock’s Green; it was paid for by his widow. Further stained glass was installed by various other benefactors, including a large west window by Hardman and Co. In 1903, an elaborate alabaster reredos, carved by Bridgman of Lichfield, was added to the east end.

In 1940, the church suffered a direct hit from a large incendiary bomb, which landed at the crossing. The church was badly damaged, with the loss of the roofs, internal furnishings, and most of the stained glass and other decoration. Remarkably, the west window and reredos survived with only minute damage, and the arcades were very little damaged, with the structure remaining sound. The church was repaired, with some modifications, during the 1950s: the steeply-pitched roof was replaced with a shallower roof, and the height of the clerestory increased; the circular clerestory windows were replaced with taller, rectangular windows. New furnishings were donated, including a new font, pulpit and west screen. The transepts and tower were never built.

SOURCES: Carew-Cox, A and Waters, W: Edward Burne-Jones – Stained Glass in Birmingham Churches (1998)

Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire (1966), 143-4

History of the County of Warwick (Victoria County History), Volume 7: City of Birmingham (1964), 391

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

* The original church was a lively composition of 1865 by a recognised regional architect, J G Bland

* This was enhanced by additions by J A Chatwin, the prolific West Midlands church architect, in the 1890s

* Although the church was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940, and the proposed tower and transepts were never added, the church as it stands retains much historic fabric of good quality, and was fully restored in the 1950s

* The damage and losses (of some interest in their own right, for showing the impact of the 1940 Blitz) are outweighed by the survival of the sumptuous and high-quality carved alabaster reredos, and the large stained glass east window, made by Morris and Co from designs by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.

Acocks Green Statutorily listed buildings

Gravestones and a column with an urn at the top of it.

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green – Gravestones and a column topped by an urn
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
This church on Warwick Road in Acocks Green is St Mary the Virgin. It is the Parish Church of Acocks Green.

It is a Grade II listed building, since July 2009, possibly to help it with renovations (can’t find listing on Heritage Gateway but it is on the Acocks Green History Society’s website).

997/0/10468 WARWICK ROAD

23-JUL-09 Acocks Green

Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin

II

An Anglican parish church in broadly C13 style, designed by J G Bland, dating from 1864-1882 with extensions of 1891-4 by J A Chatwin.

MATERIALS: The church is constructed from two colours of local sandstone, apart from red brick walls to the exterior of the transept arches marking the impact of WWII bombing; the roofs of the main church are of concrete tile, and those of the east ends of the aisles are of slate.

PLAN: The church is orientated north east-south west, though ritual compass points are used throughout this description. The plan has nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north vestry, south organ chamber and north porch.

EXTERIOR: The exterior is of red sandstone with cream sandstone dressings. The long elevations have five bays to the clerestoried nave, and a slightly lower two-bay chancel. The westernmost nave bays have aisle windows of three lights below clusters of trefoils, set into pointed archways with colonnettes with carved capitals including foliage and human heads. The clerestory windows above are paired plain lancets. In place of the transepts are continuations of the aisle in brick, with four lancets. The north porch has a steeply-gabled roof and elaborate Early English doorway with zig-zag and foliate decoration. The north vestry is also gabled, and has a further lean-to vestry with similar windows to those in the nave. The south side is similar but has a flush doorway instead of a porch in the western bay, and a C20 brick extension at the east end. The north and south sides of the chancel each have two tall two-light windows with trefoils above, running full height. The west end has a tall window of paired lancets with cusped decoration and a circular window above, with carved foliate decoration to the spandrels, and a drip mould with zig-zag decoration. Below this is a blind arcade of eight pointed arches carried on colonnettes with composite capitals and a continuous drip mould with zig-zag carving. The east window has Decorated tracery, giving five tall lights, quatrefoils and cinqefoils, and glazed spandrels.

INTERIOR: The interior has whitewashed brick walls above stone arcades. The five-bay arcades are of pointed arches in bands of red and cream sandstone, which spring from short, round piers carried on very high bases, with carved foliate capitals. The nave has an arch-braced collar-rafter roof whose trusses are carried on moulded stone corbels; the chancel roof is a timber barrel vault. The floor of the aisles is of large stone flags, and that to the east end is in polychrome tile. The westernmost bay is screened from the main body of the church by a pierced timber screen. The pews, which, like most of the furnishings were lost in the bombing of the church, have been replaced with chairs. The chancel arch and transept arches spring from slender clustered columns with foliate capitals carved by Bridgman of Lichfield. The interior of the church is dominated by the sumptuous east end. The chancel windows have red and cream banded stone surrounds, and those to the north and south sides are divided by full-height, slender clusters of columns rising to foliate capitals which serve as corbels for the trusses of the roof. A high and elaborate carved alabaster reredos, made in 1903, again by Bridgman of Lichfield, depicts Christ in Majesty, flanked by angels carrying the symbols of the Passion. Matching panels with statues of the Archangels in canopied niches are set to either side of the reredos, and the alabaster carvings are carried around the returns. Above the reredos, in a Decorated window, is a stained glass window from designs by Burne-Jones and Philip Webb, depicting the Crucifixion. The timber altar has painted angels in Pre-Raphaelite style. The altarpiece is carved from Devonshire marble, and has niches to either end housing figures of angels. The font and other furnishings date from after the church’s restoration in the 1950s, including a polygonal timber pulpit with canopy by P B Chatwin.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The church has a LYCH GATE in the west boundary wall of the plot. This has a buttressed sandstone base with a timber superstructure, under a hipped roof with slate covering, surmounted by a cream-coloured terracotta cross. Timber gates are mounted in the gateway.

HISTORY: The Church of St Mary the Virgin was begun in 1864, to designs by J G Bland, as a chapel of ease to St Eadburgha’s in Yardley. The building, consisting of part of the nave, north and south aisles and north porch, was intended to have transepts, chancel, vestries and a south-west tower added at a later date. Subsequent phases of building were dependent on donations, and progressed slowly. The church was consecrated in 1866, and a parish was created in 1867, out of part of the parish of St Eadburgha. In 1878, work to complete the nave began, with the addition of transept arches and chancel arch. From 1891-2, the church was further enlarged, by J A Chatwin, who added the chancel, organ chamber and vestries; the work was not completed until 1894. A stained glass window by Morris and Co to designs by Burne-Jones was added in 1895, in memory of Reverend Frederick Thomas Swinburn, late Vicar of Acock’s Green; it was paid for by his widow. Further stained glass was installed by various other benefactors, including a large west window by Hardman and Co. In 1903, an elaborate alabaster reredos, carved by Bridgman of Lichfield, was added to the east end.

In 1940, the church suffered a direct hit from a large incendiary bomb, which landed at the crossing. The church was badly damaged, with the loss of the roofs, internal furnishings, and most of the stained glass and other decoration. Remarkably, the west window and reredos survived with only minute damage, and the arcades were very little damaged, with the structure remaining sound. The church was repaired, with some modifications, during the 1950s: the steeply-pitched roof was replaced with a shallower roof, and the height of the clerestory increased; the circular clerestory windows were replaced with taller, rectangular windows. New furnishings were donated, including a new font, pulpit and west screen. The transepts and tower were never built.

SOURCES: Carew-Cox, A and Waters, W: Edward Burne-Jones – Stained Glass in Birmingham Churches (1998)

Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire (1966), 143-4

History of the County of Warwick (Victoria County History), Volume 7: City of Birmingham (1964), 391

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

* The original church was a lively composition of 1865 by a recognised regional architect, J G Bland

* This was enhanced by additions by J A Chatwin, the prolific West Midlands church architect, in the 1890s

* Although the church was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940, and the proposed tower and transepts were never added, the church as it stands retains much historic fabric of good quality, and was fully restored in the 1950s

* The damage and losses (of some interest in their own right, for showing the impact of the 1940 Blitz) are outweighed by the survival of the sumptuous and high-quality carved alabaster reredos, and the large stained glass east window, made by Morris and Co from designs by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.

Acocks Green Statutorily listed buildings

Gravestones and a column with an urn at the top of it.

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green

St Mary the Virgin – The Parish Church of Acocks Green
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
This church on Warwick Road in Acocks Green is St Mary the Virgin. It is the Parish Church of Acocks Green.

It is a Grade II listed building, since July 2009, possibly to help it with renovations (can’t find listing on Heritage Gateway but it is on the Acocks Green History Society’s website).

997/0/10468 WARWICK ROAD

23-JUL-09 Acocks Green

Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin

II

An Anglican parish church in broadly C13 style, designed by J G Bland, dating from 1864-1882 with extensions of 1891-4 by J A Chatwin.

MATERIALS: The church is constructed from two colours of local sandstone, apart from red brick walls to the exterior of the transept arches marking the impact of WWII bombing; the roofs of the main church are of concrete tile, and those of the east ends of the aisles are of slate.

PLAN: The church is orientated north east-south west, though ritual compass points are used throughout this description. The plan has nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north vestry, south organ chamber and north porch.

EXTERIOR: The exterior is of red sandstone with cream sandstone dressings. The long elevations have five bays to the clerestoried nave, and a slightly lower two-bay chancel. The westernmost nave bays have aisle windows of three lights below clusters of trefoils, set into pointed archways with colonnettes with carved capitals including foliage and human heads. The clerestory windows above are paired plain lancets. In place of the transepts are continuations of the aisle in brick, with four lancets. The north porch has a steeply-gabled roof and elaborate Early English doorway with zig-zag and foliate decoration. The north vestry is also gabled, and has a further lean-to vestry with similar windows to those in the nave. The south side is similar but has a flush doorway instead of a porch in the western bay, and a C20 brick extension at the east end. The north and south sides of the chancel each have two tall two-light windows with trefoils above, running full height. The west end has a tall window of paired lancets with cusped decoration and a circular window above, with carved foliate decoration to the spandrels, and a drip mould with zig-zag decoration. Below this is a blind arcade of eight pointed arches carried on colonnettes with composite capitals and a continuous drip mould with zig-zag carving. The east window has Decorated tracery, giving five tall lights, quatrefoils and cinqefoils, and glazed spandrels.

INTERIOR: The interior has whitewashed brick walls above stone arcades. The five-bay arcades are of pointed arches in bands of red and cream sandstone, which spring from short, round piers carried on very high bases, with carved foliate capitals. The nave has an arch-braced collar-rafter roof whose trusses are carried on moulded stone corbels; the chancel roof is a timber barrel vault. The floor of the aisles is of large stone flags, and that to the east end is in polychrome tile. The westernmost bay is screened from the main body of the church by a pierced timber screen. The pews, which, like most of the furnishings were lost in the bombing of the church, have been replaced with chairs. The chancel arch and transept arches spring from slender clustered columns with foliate capitals carved by Bridgman of Lichfield. The interior of the church is dominated by the sumptuous east end. The chancel windows have red and cream banded stone surrounds, and those to the north and south sides are divided by full-height, slender clusters of columns rising to foliate capitals which serve as corbels for the trusses of the roof. A high and elaborate carved alabaster reredos, made in 1903, again by Bridgman of Lichfield, depicts Christ in Majesty, flanked by angels carrying the symbols of the Passion. Matching panels with statues of the Archangels in canopied niches are set to either side of the reredos, and the alabaster carvings are carried around the returns. Above the reredos, in a Decorated window, is a stained glass window from designs by Burne-Jones and Philip Webb, depicting the Crucifixion. The timber altar has painted angels in Pre-Raphaelite style. The altarpiece is carved from Devonshire marble, and has niches to either end housing figures of angels. The font and other furnishings date from after the church’s restoration in the 1950s, including a polygonal timber pulpit with canopy by P B Chatwin.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The church has a LYCH GATE in the west boundary wall of the plot. This has a buttressed sandstone base with a timber superstructure, under a hipped roof with slate covering, surmounted by a cream-coloured terracotta cross. Timber gates are mounted in the gateway.

HISTORY: The Church of St Mary the Virgin was begun in 1864, to designs by J G Bland, as a chapel of ease to St Eadburgha’s in Yardley. The building, consisting of part of the nave, north and south aisles and north porch, was intended to have transepts, chancel, vestries and a south-west tower added at a later date. Subsequent phases of building were dependent on donations, and progressed slowly. The church was consecrated in 1866, and a parish was created in 1867, out of part of the parish of St Eadburgha. In 1878, work to complete the nave began, with the addition of transept arches and chancel arch. From 1891-2, the church was further enlarged, by J A Chatwin, who added the chancel, organ chamber and vestries; the work was not completed until 1894. A stained glass window by Morris and Co to designs by Burne-Jones was added in 1895, in memory of Reverend Frederick Thomas Swinburn, late Vicar of Acock’s Green; it was paid for by his widow. Further stained glass was installed by various other benefactors, including a large west window by Hardman and Co. In 1903, an elaborate alabaster reredos, carved by Bridgman of Lichfield, was added to the east end.

In 1940, the church suffered a direct hit from a large incendiary bomb, which landed at the crossing. The church was badly damaged, with the loss of the roofs, internal furnishings, and most of the stained glass and other decoration. Remarkably, the west window and reredos survived with only minute damage, and the arcades were very little damaged, with the structure remaining sound. The church was repaired, with some modifications, during the 1950s: the steeply-pitched roof was replaced with a shallower roof, and the height of the clerestory increased; the circular clerestory windows were replaced with taller, rectangular windows. New furnishings were donated, including a new font, pulpit and west screen. The transepts and tower were never built.

SOURCES: Carew-Cox, A and Waters, W: Edward Burne-Jones – Stained Glass in Birmingham Churches (1998)

Pevsner, N and Wedgwood, A: The Buildings of England: Warwickshire (1966), 143-4

History of the County of Warwick (Victoria County History), Volume 7: City of Birmingham (1964), 391

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The Anglican Church of St Mary the Virgin is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

* The original church was a lively composition of 1865 by a recognised regional architect, J G Bland

* This was enhanced by additions by J A Chatwin, the prolific West Midlands church architect, in the 1890s

* Although the church was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940, and the proposed tower and transepts were never added, the church as it stands retains much historic fabric of good quality, and was fully restored in the 1950s

* The damage and losses (of some interest in their own right, for showing the impact of the 1940 Blitz) are outweighed by the survival of the sumptuous and high-quality carved alabaster reredos, and the large stained glass east window, made by Morris and Co from designs by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.

Acocks Green Statutorily listed buildings

It says on this "Enter into his gates with thanks giving"

Could get a shot with the wording all in one, that and it was a bit bright.

Jesus delivered by a virgin

Jesus delivered by a virgin

Jesus came to earth as a human being. He was born of a virgin and lived a sinless life. He went to the cross of Calvary
And paid the price for our sin. Then He rose from the dead, sat
Down at the right hand of the daddy, and sent the Holy spook
To live in the hearts of people who believe. So now you and I am able to
Come and simply surrender our lives to Him, and the Holy
Spook can come into our hearts and give us a new life.

I thank god for the reality of the risen, resurrected Lord Jesus Christ.
if you would like to see Jesus obviously, take your Bible or go
To the back of this book and read through the gospels of
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Underline everything He did and
Everything he said. Put yourself in every verse. I’ve been at the
Pool of Bethesda. At what point did you go there? you might ask. I
Went there in the pages of the Word of God!

Now there’s at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool,
Which is called in the Hebrew tongue Bethesda, having
5 porches.

In these lay a great profusion of impotent folks, of blind,
Halt, withered, waiting for the moving of the water.
JOHN 5:2-3

I’ve been there. I have seen it in the Spirit! When you walk
Through the pages of the Word of God, Jesus will walk right off
The pages of the Gospel and into your heart. The living fact of
The resurrected Lord will walk up and down in your heart. The
Bible says, blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have
assumed ( John 20:29 ). I’ve not seen, but I think. I haven’t
Seen with my natural eye, but I have seen Him with the eye of my
Spirit in the pages of the Word of God.

The Word says, Lo, I come in the volume of the book
( Hebrews 10:7 ). We must see Him as he actually isn’t through
The eyes of religious tradition, but thru the eyes of the Holy
Spirit and God’s Word.

Jesus wasn’t a barefoot, scrawny, weak-kneed individual with a
Lamb under His arm who spoke in Elizabethan English, For yea, as
Thou hast gathered here this day. that’s not Jesus, that’s faith
And custom. If you studied the Bible, you can see that the reputation Jesus
Had among the religious folk was that of a gluttonous man and
A winebibber, because He hung around with the sinners. Religious
folks do not need to be around sinners, and they failed to like Jesus
because he convicted them of their hard-heartedness.

Rodney Howard-Browne.com is a website dedicated to the news and events of resurgence in America. Rodney Howard Browne gave his heart to the Lord at the age of five. He came to America with a keenness burning in his heart to see souls saved and lives touched. In December 1987 he journeyed to America to meet the call and plan and purpose of God. The Lord ordered him to, Stir up the churches and tell them to get ready for the approaching revival. in order to see a great harvest of souls. He feels that God has called him to teach the body of Christ, by example, so that the presence of God can be made welcome and so that he will be able to touch His children as He sees fit. He has seen mighty revivals break out in North, South and Central America, Africa ( including South Africa ), the united kingdom, Europe, Scandinavia, East Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines, and Israel and run anywhere from one to four consecutive weeks. He was called to stir up the churches and the pastors, shake them out of their complacency, fire them up to press in deeper with the Holy Spirit, and then leave them to do what God has called them to do in their town. Rodney Howard Browne and his ministry team, under the banner of Revival Ministries world, travel about 46 weeks of the year, holding weekly meetings in cities across North America and around the globe. They also pastor a church in Tampa, Florida, The brook at Tampa Bay, which he founded and which now has three thousand members.

Love and Blessings
Pastor Rodney Howard Browne
.

About Rodney Howard Browne
Christian news and events with Dr. Rodney Howard Browne are continously posted on this site. We cover the world to to keep viewers posted and informed. We appreciate all your comments and suggestions for our site.

Front-yard Virgin Mary owner bans public

Front-yard Virgin Mary owner bans public
A Windsor, Ont., homeowner has banned people from visiting her front-yard Virgin Mary statue.
Read more on CBC.ca

Rep. Paul Kanjorski, Sunk by Wave of Discontent – Dan Barry
Representative Paul E. Kanjorski, a Democrat from Pennsylvania, lost to a challenger he had defeated two other times. He very nearly saw it coming.
Read more on New York Times

Scores of Iraqis Killed in Bombing Blitz
Listen to the Audio HARI SREENIVASAN: At least 76 Iraqis were killed today in a bombing blitz aimed at Shiites in Baghdad. At least 13 car bombs and roadside blasts ripped through Shiite neighborhoods. Police and hospitals said, in addition to the dead, nearly 200 people were wounded. The attacks came as funerals were held in Baghdad for victims of a hostage siege at a Roman Catholic Church – 58 …
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Christiansted, Saint Croix, Virgin Islands. Catholic [i.e. Anglican] church (LOC)

Christiansted, Saint Croix, Virgin Islands. Catholic [i.e. Anglican] church (LOC)
church
Image by The Library of Congress
Delano, Jack,, 1914-, photographer.

Christiansted, Saint Croix, Virgin Islands. Catholic [i.e. Anglican] church

1941 Dec.

1 slide : color.

Notes:
Photo shows St. John’s Anglican Church, 27 King St. (Source: Library staff, 2009)
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Anglican churches
United States–Virgin Islands of the United States–Christiansted

Format: Slides–Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 11671-26 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Persistent URL: hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a33961

Call Number: LC-USF35-426

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