Tag Archives: Village

Odzun 7th C. Armenian Basilica, Odzun village, Lori Province, Armenia

Odzun 7th C. Armenian Basilica, Odzun village, Lori Province, Armenia
Church names
Image by james_gordon_losangeles
Odzun Church is an Armenian basilica constructed around the 5th-7th century in the Odzun village of the Lori Province of Armenia.

History
The first church appeared here in the 6th century. In the 8th century it was reconstructed by Hovhannes III Odznetsi who served as the catholikos between 717 and 728 and was, as his name suggests, from Odzun. This is the time the church got its current form of a pink felsite basilica with three naves, the two side naves being narrow. At the northern (not preserved anymore) and southern side there are unusual arcaded cloisters and the west cloister has a blind wall with an arched entrance in the middle. The roof is barrel vaulted. Four columns support the rib vaulted tambour and there are two more columns at the western part of the church. At the eastern façade above the central window one can observe a carving of Christ with the gospel of St. John and two angels below. At the southern façade, at each side of the central window there are two angels and traces of another figure, probably Christ. Much later, in the 19th century two small belltowers were added.

There are numerous gravestones of the clergy around the church and a funerary monument. Its stepped platform supports two carved stelae between double arches. The east and west sides of the monument are carved with scenes from the Bible and introduction of Christianity in Armenia. Its north and south side are carved with geometrical motifs and floral shapes. It is suggested that this monument commemorates Hovhannes Odznetsi, but its style suggests that it was probably erected earlier, in the 6th century.

This is one of only two such funerary monuments in Armenia. The one located in Odzun was given as a gift to Armenia from an Indian King around the 8th century. The other one is situated in Aghudi in southern Armenian province of Syunik.

Lefton Colonial Village 07334- Fellowship Church

Lefton Colonial Village 07334- Fellowship Church

  • Lefton Fine China Christmas Chruch
  • LEFTON COLONIAL VILLAGE 07334- FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
  • Lighted Church

LEFTON COLONIAL VILLAGE 07334- FELLOWSHIP CHURCH Is preowned. The last owner signed it with her name and the date bought 1990. On the botton of the chruch. It says designed by Byron Woods, has a red sticker with Lefton and a gold and white sticker with Lefton Fine China. Also it is signed “Church” copyright 1989. Also has Geo Z Lefton embossed on the piece. And the number 07334. It is a Christmas Deco Piece. Beaufitul old country chruch.

Price:

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, a beautiful but plain looking Georgian style structure is the second oldest church building in Manhattan, dating back to the 18th century. Constructed of schist, a dull grey stone, readily available from the bedrock of Manhattan, kept building costs down eliminating the need for quarried stone.

In 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, Governor of New Amsterdam, purchased land for a bowery or farm from the Dutch West India Company and by 1660 built a family chapel at the present day site of St. Marks Church. Stuyvesant died in 1678 and was interred in a vault under the chapel. Stuyvesant’s great-grandson, Petrus, would donate the chapel property to Episcopal Church in 1793, stipulating that a new chapel be erected and in 1795 the cornerstone of the present day St. Mark’s Church was laid. The church was completed and consecrated in 1799. And Alexander Hamilton would then provide legal aid in incorporating St. Mark’s Church as the first Episcopal Parish independent of Trinity Church in the new world.

In 1828, the church steeple and Greek revival clock tower, designed by Ithiel Town, of Town and Thompson, was erected. In 1835, the two-story fieldstone Sunday School was completed and in 1838, St. Mark’s Church established the Parish Infant School for poor children. In 1854, the Italian cast iron porch with ionic columns and a simple balustrade,completed the church. In 1861, St. Mark’s Church commissioned a brick addition to the Sunday School, the present day Parish Hall, designed and supervised by architect James Renwick Jr, who designed Grace Church and would go onto building St. Patrick’s Cathedral. In 1900, leading architect Ernest Flagg designed the rectory.

On July 27, 1978, a fire nearly destroyed St. Mark’s Church. The Citizens to Save St Mark’s was founded to raise funds for its reconstruction and the Preservation Youth Project undertakes the reconstruction supervised by architects Harold Edleman and craftspeople provided by preservation contractor I. Maas & Sons. The Landmark Fund emerged from the Citizens to Save St Mark’s and continues to exist to help maintain and preserve St. Mark’s Church for future generations.

St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery is hallowed ground not only for Episcopalians, but devotees of avant-garde arts as well. Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham danced here in the 20s and 30s, and the cutting-edge Danspace Project, founded in 1974, continues that legacy with a full schedule of performances in the airy, open main hall. Literature has been just as revered: The late, great Allen Ginsberg was a recurring participant in the church’s resident Poetry Project (a nationally recognized force). Furthermore, St. Mark’s has been a happy home for legendary experimental theater auteur Richard Foreman. The space has so thoroughly established itself as an essential component of the arts community that it’s easy to forget that this is still a functioning church

St. Marks Churchyard houses many burial vaults. The West Yard is known as the Healing Garden, providing an oasis from city life. Some of the ancient maples in the yard were lost to the Asian Longhorn Beetle in 2000. This area was a proposed (and rejected) site for two 18-story apartment towers designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. Among the famous buried here are Daniel Tompkins, who abolished slavery in New York; Commodore Matthew Perry, who forced Japan to accept U.S. trade; New York Mayor Philip Hone; and Peter Stuyvesant. Department store pioneer A.T. Stewart, whose store filled the block between 9th and 10th streets east of Broadway, was buried here in 1876, but on November 6, 1878, his body was snatched and held for 0,000 ransom. The widow eventually regained possession of the corpse in 1881, after bargaining the kidnappers down to ,000. He now rests elsewhere.

Saint Mark’s-in-the-Bowery Church was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966.

National Register #72000885 (1972)

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, a beautiful but plain looking Georgian style structure is the second oldest church building in Manhattan, dating back to the 18th century. Constructed of schist, a dull grey stone, readily available from the bedrock of Manhattan, kept building costs down eliminating the need for quarried stone.

In 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, Governor of New Amsterdam, purchased land for a bowery or farm from the Dutch West India Company and by 1660 built a family chapel at the present day site of St. Marks Church. Stuyvesant died in 1678 and was interred in a vault under the chapel. Stuyvesant’s great-grandson, Petrus, would donate the chapel property to Episcopal Church in 1793, stipulating that a new chapel be erected and in 1795 the cornerstone of the present day St. Mark’s Church was laid. The church was completed and consecrated in 1799. And Alexander Hamilton would then provide legal aid in incorporating St. Mark’s Church as the first Episcopal Parish independent of Trinity Church in the new world.

In 1828, the church steeple and Greek revival clock tower, designed by Ithiel Town, of Town and Thompson, was erected. In 1835, the two-story fieldstone Sunday School was completed and in 1838, St. Mark’s Church established the Parish Infant School for poor children. In 1854, the Italian cast iron porch with ionic columns and a simple balustrade,completed the church. In 1861, St. Mark’s Church commissioned a brick addition to the Sunday School, the present day Parish Hall, designed and supervised by architect James Renwick Jr, who designed Grace Church and would go onto building St. Patrick’s Cathedral. In 1900, leading architect Ernest Flagg designed the rectory.

On July 27, 1978, a fire nearly destroyed St. Mark’s Church. The Citizens to Save St Mark’s was founded to raise funds for its reconstruction and the Preservation Youth Project undertakes the reconstruction supervised by architects Harold Edleman and craftspeople provided by preservation contractor I. Maas & Sons. The Landmark Fund emerged from the Citizens to Save St Mark’s and continues to exist to help maintain and preserve St. Mark’s Church for future generations.

St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery is hallowed ground not only for Episcopalians, but devotees of avant-garde arts as well. Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham danced here in the 20s and 30s, and the cutting-edge Danspace Project, founded in 1974, continues that legacy with a full schedule of performances in the airy, open main hall. Literature has been just as revered: The late, great Allen Ginsberg was a recurring participant in the church’s resident Poetry Project (a nationally recognized force). Furthermore, St. Mark’s has been a happy home for legendary experimental theater auteur Richard Foreman. The space has so thoroughly established itself as an essential component of the arts community that it’s easy to forget that this is still a functioning church

St. Marks Churchyard houses many burial vaults. The West Yard is known as the Healing Garden, providing an oasis from city life. Some of the ancient maples in the yard were lost to the Asian Longhorn Beetle in 2000. This area was a proposed (and rejected) site for two 18-story apartment towers designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. Among the famous buried here are Daniel Tompkins, who abolished slavery in New York; Commodore Matthew Perry, who forced Japan to accept U.S. trade; New York Mayor Philip Hone; and Peter Stuyvesant. Department store pioneer A.T. Stewart, whose store filled the block between 9th and 10th streets east of Broadway, was buried here in 1876, but on November 6, 1878, his body was snatched and held for 0,000 ransom. The widow eventually regained possession of the corpse in 1881, after bargaining the kidnappers down to ,000. He now rests elsewhere.

Saint Mark’s-in-the-Bowery Church was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966.

National Register #72000885 (1972)

NYC – East Village: St. Stanislaus Church

NYC – East Village: St. Stanislaus Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
This 9-11 memorial bas-relief plaque is the same as the one that adorns the west side of Andrzej Pityski’s Katyn Memorial, which is pictured a the base of the towers here, in Jersey City. It memorializes the fallen Polish victims of the September 11th attacks–Maria Jakubiak, Lukasz Milewski, Dorota Kopiczko, Anna Pietkiewicz-DeBin, Jan Maciejewski, and Nortber Szurkowski.

Saint Stanislaus Church, at 101 East 7th Street, is home to the oldest and only Polish Roman-Catholic parish, under the invocation of St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr, which can be traced back to 1872 and a small wooden church at 318 Henry Street. The parish quickly outgrew those accomodations and moved into a former Presbyterian Church on Stanton Street before laying the cornerstone for the current building, under the guidance of Reverend Jan Strzelecki. The new church was dedicated by Archbishop M.A. Corrigan and Bishop J.M. Farley on May 19, 1901.

St. Giles Church in the Village of Hartington in Derbyshire

St. Giles Church in the Village of Hartington in Derbyshire
St Church
Image by UGArdener
Best Seen Large on Black: bighugelabs.com/onblack.php?id=4800924259&size=large&…

Taken on an early morning walk before breakfast. We spent five nights in the magnificent YHA Hostel that is located in this village. We used it as a base for cycling on the Tissington Trail and the High Peaks Trail, and for walks into Beresford Dale, Biggen Dale, Wolfscote Dale, and Dovedale. If you click on the set to the right, you can run the SLIDESHOW in FullScreen Mode, see the hostel itself, and follow us around the town .

The town itself, though quite small, had much to recommend it. Here are some quotes from the Wikipedia Entry:

"Hartington is a village in the Derbyshire Peak District, England, lying on the River Dove. According to the 2001 census the parish of Hartington Town Quarter, which also includes Pilsbury, had a population of 345. Formerly known for the mining of ironstone, limestone and lead, the village is now known for cheese-making and tourism.

Notable buildings in the village include: the market hall (formerly the site of a market); the 13th century parish church of Saint Giles; and 17th century Hartington Hall. A prominent house in the centre of the village is Bank House, built by the former village mill owner and in the past used as the village bank. A half-mile to the south of the village, on the Dove, is the fishing house of the famous angler Charles Cotton. In the north of the village is Pilsbury Castle,[1] an 11th century motte-and-bailey castle, that survives only as an earthwork.

Near Hartington is the finest neolithic stone circle in the Peak District, Arbor Low. There are numerous ancient tumuli and cairns in the landscape around Hartington, probably dating from the Bronze Age. Hartington Mill, now a private house, stands by the River Dove. This was the local water mill for grinding corn.

The village has a youth hostel at Hartington Hall, which serves two major National Cycle Network routes; the Tissington Trail and the High Peak Trail, which meet at nearby Parsley Hay. These trails pass just under one mile to the east of the village, and offer 30 miles of off-road cycling and walking along old railway trackbeds through the Peak District National Park. Hartington signal box, on the site of the former Hartington railway station, and nearly two miles distant from the village, has been renovated and converted to a Visitor Centre.

A little south of the village, overlooking the Dove, stands Wolfscote Hill (388m at grid reference SK137583), a good viewpoint, now in the care of the National Trust.

Three miles to the south-west lies the small settlement of Hulme End, which marks the northern starting point of the Manifold Way, an 8 mile tarmacked walk- and cycle-route following the route of the former Leek and Manifold Valley Light Railway.

Hartington was mentioned in the Domesday book as belonging to Henry de Ferrers and being worth forty shillings.[2] The parish was originally quite large, and part of the hundred of Wirksworth. Hartington had four townships, known as the Town Quarter, Nether Quarter, and Middle Quarter, and Upper Quarter, which are now all separate parishes. These became separate civil parishes in their own right in 1866.[3] They are marked on Ordnance Survey maps.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hartington

NYC – East Village: St Nicholas Church

NYC – East Village: St Nicholas Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
St Nicholas Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, also referred to as St. Nicholas of Myra Church, dates back to 1883 when it was built by James Renwick Jr as the missionary chapel for St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church. The current parish members bought the red brick and terra-cotta Gothic Revival building in 1936.

Department 56 Dickens’ Village St Luke’s Church Lit House

Department 56 Dickens’ Village St Luke’s Church Lit House

  • Dickens Village lit house with lightcord
  • Porcelain
  • St. Luke’s stone church with flying buttresses and four spired front steeple porcelain lit house
  • Christmas decoration not a toy remove surface dust with fine brush or feather duster use no liquid cleaners

Department 56 Villages set the gold standard for Holiday lit houses. The Dickens’ Village Series of hand-painted porcelain houses debuted in 1984. Victorian England at the time of Charles Dickens was a center of culture for the world, where many traditions we celebrate today took shape. This series will inspire your feelings of Christmas past and yet to come. in 2010 we continue to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Dickens’ Village Series.

List Price: $ 125.00

Price: $ 100.00