Tag Archives: United

Trinity United Church of Christ?

Question by Eve95: Trinity United Church of Christ?
I understand that Obama resigned his membership from Trinity yesterday, which is his personal decision and I certainly don’t have a problem with that. What I don’t understand is why everybody is calling this man a racist as a result of his connection with the church. I grew up in that church (from the ages of 10-20) and one thing that I can tell you is that I always loved listening to Rev. Wright. He was one of those few preachers that actually had my attention during all his sermons (as a child, it can be very easy to zone out during the sermon part of service). I thought he was rather exciting, never boring. Never once in my time there did I ever think that Rev. Wright was a racist. That never ever crossed my mind. And guess what? I’m not a racist! (*gasp*) I treat others the way I would like to be treated and I go on about my life. I’m not sitting around hating anybody due to things that have happened in the past. I always saw Rev. Wright as passionate, never racist.

Best answer:

Answer by KEEP FIGHTING
Good for you. Glad you enjoyed it. But if he truly “loves” his church, why would he abandon it for political gain? Don’t you think that shows an alarming lack of principles?

Add your own answer in the comments!

Richmond Hill St Andrew’s United Reformed (Congregational) Church, Bournemouth, Dorset

Richmond Hill St Andrew’s United Reformed (Congregational) Church, Bournemouth, Dorset
Church Covenant
Image by Alwyn Ladell
The Milennium Tapestry consists of ten embroidered panels around the text: "Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, today, and forever" and eight types of cross used by different denominations. The panels depict: (1) Creation, (2) Garden of Eden, (3) Moses receiving the Ten Commandments, (4) Nativity, (5) The Cross and Resurrection, (6) St Paul’s journey from Jerusalem to Rome, (7) Mediaeval panel – a journey through our Faith, (8) First printed Bible, (9) Victorian Sunday Schools, (10) the Covenanted Churches of the Town Centre

What are the differences between the Catholic Church and United Church of Christ?

Question by Kimberly: What are the differences between the Catholic Church and United Church of Christ?
I was born and raised Catholic, but left several years ago as it didn’t seem like the right fit for me. Now, I have found United Church of Christ and after attending a few services I’m contemplating joining the congregation. While the religious aspect is similar to what I’m used to, the fundamentals are very different so I’m really hoping to find some people who have made / are making the same transition I am that might be able to illuminate the differences in the faiths.

Any help is appreciated!

Best answer:

Answer by ★Marisa Kirisame★
I’ve never heard of the United Church of Christ…

What do you think? Answer below!

Grace United Methodist Church

Grace United Methodist Church
List of churches
Image by NCinDC
Grace United Methodist Church located at 7882 Main Street in Middletown, Virginia. The building is designated as a contributing property to the Middletown Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 2003.

From the historic district’s NRHP nomination form:
"The present Grace United Methodist Church, built in 1897, is an unusual Romanesque Revival-style structure with a seventy-five-foot tower containing a hand-played carillon. It replaced the former Grace United Methodist Church, built around 1852…"

From the church’s website:
"There is a record of Methodism in Middletown as early as 1816. John Senseney, nephew of the founder of Middletown, recorded in his diary that he joined the Methodist Society in 1816 and that there were twelve members. The first church was a log structure on Senseney Avenue. In 1853, a new brick structure was built on the site of the old log church. The new church was dedicated on December 18, 1853, as part of the Winchester Circuit.

During the Civil War, it was used as a stable and hospital for Federal troops. The present church building was begun in 1896 and dedicated on July 31, 1898. It is built with native dressed blue limestone, quarried locally, and the roof is covered with slate tiles. In 1989, a kitchen, fellowship hall, office, restrooms, and additional classrooms were added.

Grace has one of the last hand-played carillons in the Shenandoah Valley and the old hymns continue to ring out over Middletown every Sunday morning."

Richmond Hill Congregational (United Reformed) Church, Bournemouth

Richmond Hill Congregational (United Reformed) Church, Bournemouth
Church Covenant
Image by Alwyn Ladell
The original Richmond Hill Congregational Church. The land in Sanatorium Road (later renamed Bourne Avenue) was given by George Durrant. The foundation stone was laid on 4th July, 1854, but the church did not open for worship until 8th March, 1859 (a legal challenge regarding land ownership, due to alleged outstanding mortgage payments, having led to delays). The Covenant to form the church was signed by twenty-four people in 1856. The first Minister was Rev Hector McMillan, a Presbyterian. However, by the end of that same year the first corrugated iron St Andrew’s "Scotch" Presbyterian Church was erected at the bottom of Richmond Hill. The foundation stone for an extension (lecture rooms and a classroom) was laid in 1876 but, by the time the Rev Ossian Davies became Minister in 1887, the rapidly growing population had outgrown the first church and plans were laid for a full rebuild. The final service in this building was on 4th May, 1890, after which it was immediately demolished to make way for the new church was was opened the following year. However, the corner stone was relaid on September the 3rd, 1890, as part of the replacement church.