Tag Archives: Tips

Book Stand, Straight Back, Aluminum, with Black Plastic Tips

Book Stand, Straight Back, Aluminum, with Black Plastic Tips

  • DOES NOT HOLD BOOKS OPEN FOR HANDS-FREE READING.
  • Our aluminum book stands are for displaying items indoors, like the cover of a book, or disc, or the front of an e-book reader. The book stand can hold items that are roughly 1 3/4 of an inch wideItems for display should be tilted back. Approx. Weight of each Book Stand is 1/2 ounce. Approximate size H 5″, W 2″, Depth 3″. Width is adjustable by hand. Great display stand for your nightstand at home, schools, offices, book stores, libraries, and churches. Great gift for book lovers.
  • Good way to display CDs, DVDs, Blu-Rays, Kindles. Order 19 or more to receive 10% OFF and FREE SHIPPING or order 38 or more for our best savings:20% off and FREE SHIPPING: only .99 each! Save 10% on all items offered by Holders, Stands and More when you spend .00 or more. Enter code 9F5ZU57J at checkout. Save 20% on all items offered by Holders, Stands and More when you spend 0.00 or more. Enter code KTCK3VV8 at checkout.
  • This Book Stand is best suited for items that aren’t thicker than about 2 inches.
  • For thicker or extra heavy books we recommend our Bent Back Book Stands. (Search Amazon for Bent Back Book Stands)

This Book Stand, which we call our Straight Back Book Stand, has black tips and will hold a book from a paperback to a 1.5 inch thick hard cover. A good way to display a CD, Blue Ray, E-book, or DVD. Add it to your library supplies. DOES NOT HOLD BOOKS OPEN FOR HANDS-FREE READING.
Approx. size H 5″, W 2″, Depth 3″.

List Price: $ 2.69

Price: $ 2.69

Ten Tips On Getting Music Teacher Jobs

Ten Tips On Getting Music Teacher Jobs

Now that you’re almost done with your education, you may be looking seriously at finding a job as a music teacher for next year. After several years in college, making the transition from college student to working professional isn’t always easy. Here are ten tips on finding and getting music teacher jobs that will help get you on your way to a great career.

1. Start looking early. The best time to find openings in music teacher jobs is in late March and early April, when school departments are hiring for the upcoming school year. During your student teaching months, get your resume and reference letters put together and start shopping your resume around. Be sure that you let teachers, colleagues and friends know that you’re looking for music teacher jobs – other people are your best source of job leads.

2. Decide what type of music teacher jobs you really want. Knowing whether you want to work with elementary school or pre-schoolers rather than high schoolers, or vice versa will help narrow your job search down to manageable proportions.

3. Remember that YOU are responsible for finding a job. The school districts will not come to you – you have to go after them aggressively. Decide where you want to work, and get your resume out to them. Follow up with phone calls and letters to get an interview and be prepared to go in there and wow them in the interview.

4. Networking is one of the most important things you can do to find music teacher jobs. Let your college career office know that you are looking, let your mother know that you are looking and talk about your job hunt when the opportunity arises. You can be even more proactive – assemble a list of people you know who might hear of music teacher jobs that are open and contact them with a pleasant, polite letter letting them know that you’re looking and asking for any advice or information that they can offer.

5. Check the bulletin board at your local schools. This is one of those often overlooked resources. Most school districts advertise all job openings internally before posting job openings publicly. If you’re practice teaching, you’ve got a good reason to be in the school where you can regularly scan the teacher’s bulletin board for information about music teacher jobs and other job openings.

6. Check with placement companies. More and more often, school departments and private schools are turning to job placement agencies to present them with job candidates for more specialized positions like music teacher jobs. You’ll need a good resume and cover letter, and the nerve to pick up the telephone and ask for an interview.

7. Use the Internet to make your search for music teacher jobs easier. If the local teacher’s union has a web site, that’s a great place to start your job search, but don’t leave out the old standards – http://Monster.com, Yahoo’s HotJobs and other big job recruitment sites.

8. Spend some time on your resume. Don’t just slapdash your resume together. Sit down with it and take the time to correlate your job history, education, professional experience and volunteer experience. Remember to keep it brief – but make sure the important information gets in there. In this case, your summer job at McDonald’s may not mean anything at all – but your six years attending band camp, progressing from student to head counselor certainly will.

9. Don’t send your resume out naked. Never assume that your resume will ‘speak for itself’. A cover letter is an important part of your job search package. Once you pick out a couple of music teacher jobs to which you want to apply, personally tailor a cover letter to each school district. The cover letter should be no more than two to three paragraphs, and should include how you heard about the position, the reasons why you think you’d be a good choice for the job, and contact information. You should also make a point of asking for an interview with a sentence like, “I’m very interested in learning more about the vacant music teacher position, and look forward to a chance to discuss how my skills would be an asset in the classroom. I will call early next week to be sure that my resume arrived safely. Thank you for your time and consideration.”

10. At the interview, be prepared with some questions of your own. Make a point of coming up with a list of questions – and bring the list with you so you don’t forget. Some sample questions include, “How many classes per week will I be teaching?” and “Are there any traditional music ensembles or performances that I’ll be expected to prepare students for?”

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

4 Major Tips to Keep Your Church Website Visitor Coming Back for More

4 Major Tips to Keep Your Church Website Visitor Coming Back for More

So you have a rocking cool church website. You just recently redesigned it but what’s next?
Having a website is not enough. You need to make your church website not just another one of million others on the world wide web. Your goal is to make it an effective online ministry.

First step of course is to get your church website visible on the search engines based on the keywords that you believe your “prospects” will use in order to find you. Assuming this has been accomplished, how do you encourage your visitors to keep coming back to your website?

Here are some tips:
1. Regularly update your content.
Nothing can be more disappointing for a visitor than to go back to a church website only to find the same content from 3 or 6 months ago. Add new content even if it’s just the news and events section. If you have a flash slideshow, add 2 or 3 different photos every week. There are a lot of websites that offer free stock photos. If you have a blog, post an article once a week. If there is nothing to put on the news and events section, which is rarely a case, add quotes from men or women of God or verse of the day on the homepage.

2. Offer free resources.
There are different forms of resources that you can offer your visitors:

a. Articles
If possible, post original articles about topics that you believe will benefit both your
church members and website visitors.  It can be both scriptural and practical. You can
also post notes about your past messages, devotionals or short Bible studies.

b. Sermon Audios
Perhaps this is the most valuable resource that you could offer your site visitors.
Whether it’s a church member who might have missed a Sunday service or a site
visitor that is simply looking for some messages to minister to them, this is a great
tool to keep them coming back for more.

c. Videos
Web users love short clip videos. If your website is capable of streaming videos,
be sure to post videos of your services to give site visitors a glimpse of what your
Sunday service is like. Videos of your gatherings and other events are also great.

3. Allow interaction.
Ever wonder why social networking websites are successful? Because they allow interaction. They allow “online fellowship.”  If you have a blog, allow commenting on your blog. If your website has polls, regularly post new polls. If your budget allows, get a forum included. These venues create a venue for your visitors to interact with you and with each other.

4. Make it real.
Create a photo gallery section in your website and show photos of actual people in your church – whether it’s a worship gathering or fun activities, this is something that your site visitors will enjoy. By posting these kind of photos, you give your visitors a sense of who
you are and what you are all about and it gives them a sense that you are real.

Lynne Gabriel is the owner of TheChurchWebsiteDesigners.com – a church website design company based in Houston, TX. They build custom church website design that are visually-appealing, user-friendly, and easy-to-manage.