Tag Archives: Theology

David Jeremiah & Calvary Chapel Theology Exposed and Debunked A CHRISTIAN “MUST WATCH” 4345818

Are you swept into the modern “Gospel” that denies core, essential truths of the Gospel for the sake of tickling your ears and telling you what you want to h…
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Ingle-gillis, William C.’s The Trinity and Ecumenical Church Thought (Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology, and Biblical Studies) by Ingle-gillis, William C. published by Ashgate Publishing [Hardcover] (2007)

Ingle-gillis, William C.’s The Trinity and Ecumenical Church Thought (Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology, and Biblical Studies) by Ingle-gillis, William C. published by Ashgate Publishing [Hardcover] (2007)

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What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

What is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

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Few evangelical Christians today understand Reformed theology, even though it has become an immensely influential theological tradition. Recognizing only key terms relating to predestination or the five points, many Christians want a better explanation of the concepts and beliefs that make up a Reformed perspective.

What is Reformed Theology? is an introduction to a doctrine that has eluded so many evangelical Christians. And who better to teach about Reformed theology than R. C. Sproul? In thoroughly expounding the foundational doctrines and five points, Sproul asserts the reality of God’s amazing grace.

For anyone wanting to know more about Reformed theology, this candid book offers a coherent and complete introduction to an established belief.

Previously published as Grace Unknown

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A Rational Theology as Taught by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

A Rational Theology as Taught by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1932. Widtsoe, a member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles, writes: A rational theology, as understood in this volume, is a theology which 1) is based on fundamental principles that harmonize with the knowledge and reason of man, 2) derives all of its laws, ordinances and authority from the accepted fundamental principles, and 3) finds expression and use in the everyday life of man. In short, a rational theology is derived from the invariable laws of the universe, and exists for the good of man. This volume is an exposition; it is not an argument. The principles of the Gospel, as held by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, are stated briefly, simply and without comment, to show the coherence, reasonableness and universality of the Gospel philosophy. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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A New Way of Belonging: Covenant Theology, China, and the Christian Reformed Church, 1921-1951 (The Historical Series of the Reformed Church in America)

A New Way of Belonging: Covenant Theology, China, and the Christian Reformed Church, 1921-1951 (The Historical Series of the Reformed Church in America)

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State of the Pulpit – Theology of Suffering

Thisclip is taken from the sermon “The Rebel’s Guide to Joy in Suffering ,” preached by Pastor Mark Driscoll at the Mars Hill Church Ballard campus in Seattle, Washington, on October 21, 200. It is the 3rd sermon in our sermon series on the book of Philippines. To watch the full sermon, visit: www.marshillchurch.org

Trinity Trumping Theology

Trinity Trumping Theology

There are so many things in the Bible, in most religions, that are highly practical and the core of living life large. There are also mysteries which will probably always remain so. Then there are those doctrines that many churches deem a LITMUS TEST for membership or even salvation: embracing the trinity is one of those. 

I confess that I don’t really get the critical nature that the trinity poses for some denominations within Christianity.

Yes, I spent a great deal of time studying the trinitarian concept. Once upon a time in an arrogant era of my life I thought I KNEW it. Now, I can play around with it, enjoy what it says to me; however, my salvation isn’t predicated on my whole-hearted adherence to such doctrinal guidelines.

How can the finite understand such an infinite paradigm?

Furthermore, why is it so important: since Jesus never believed in such a doctrine, Jesus never required any kind of creedal belief from anyone, and the apostle Paul never mentioned it? Additionally, there are no explicit statements found in the New Testament. What is found is the phrase in Matthew (added much later) about baptizing in the “Father, Son, and Hoy Ghost”. 

Then in Acts we’re to baptize only in the name of Jesus too?  🙂

And it is a requirement of my faith?

I’m all for whatever anyone wants to believe and any denomination has the right to establish whatever creeds, rules, and rituals they want to follow which is why we have more than 7,000 Christian denominations is America alone. But, don’t ride your high horse into my corral and try to say that your trinity trumps my theology- especially since you’ve never shared a meal with me.

Know what I’m saying Martha?

As a spiritual-futurist, I have a BA degree majoring in history. One cannot know the future without knowing the past which holds clues to what is on the horizon. The world is in such a rapid expansion of knowledge that we are close to entering a tipping point that will forever change earth as we know it.

Trinity Trumping Theology?

Trinity Trumping Theology?

There are so many things in the Bible, in most religions, that are highly practical and the core of living life large. There are also mysteries which will probably always remain so. Then there are those doctrines that many churches deem a LITMUS TEST for membership or even salvation: embracing the trinity is one of those. 

I confess that I don’t really get the critical nature that the trinity poses for some denominations within Christianity.

Yes, I spent a great deal of time studying the trinitarian concept. Once upon a time in an arrogant era of my life I thought I KNEW it. Now, I can play around with it, enjoy what it says to me; however, my salvation isn’t predicated on my whole-hearted adherence to such doctrinal guidelines.

How can the finite understand such an infinite paradigm?

Furthermore, why is it so important: since Jesus never believed in such a doctrine, Jesus never required any kind of creedal belief from anyone, and the apostle Paul never mentioned it? Additionally, there are no explicit statements found in the New Testament. What is found is the phrase in Matthew (added much later) about baptizing in the “Father, Son, and Hoy Ghost”. 

Then in Acts we’re to baptize only in the name of Jesus too?  🙂

And it is a requirement of my faith?

I’m all for whatever anyone wants to believe and any denomination has the right to establish whatever creeds, rules, and rituals they want to follow which is why we have more than 7,000 Christian denominations is America alone. But, don’t ride your high horse into my corral and try to say that your trinity trumps my theology- especially since you’ve never shared a meal with me.

Know what I’m saying Martha?

As a spiritual-futurist, I have a BA degree majoring in history. One cannot know the future without knowing the past which holds clues to what is on the horizon. The world is in such a rapid expansion of knowledge that we are close to entering a tipping point that will forever change earth as we know it.

Trinity, Church, and the Human Person (Faith & Reason: Studies in Catholic Theology & Philosophy)

Trinity, Church, and the Human Person (Faith & Reason: Studies in Catholic Theology & Philosophy)

This book provides the best instruction on the most difficult issues that characterize St. Thomas Aquinas’s Trinitarian theology. It explores the very purpose of Trinitarian theology, with an emphasis on distinguishing St. Thomas’s approach from the various forms of arid rationalism and on displaying Aquinas’s debt to Augustine’s spiritual vision. The chapters on the Trinity engage the relationship of the Holy Spirit to the Son according to Aquinas–a topic treated in Trinity in Aquinas but now deepened by a meditation on “the Spirit of Truth”–as well as the “personal mode” of Trinitarian action ad extra. For readers seeking to understand how and why Aquinas’s theology is fully Trinitarian rather than (as is sometimes suggested) modalist, Emery’s exposition of the Trinitarian action ad extra and our relation in grace to each Person of the Trinity will be necessary reading. Fr. Emery devotes two chapters to the sacraments as they relate to the Church, in each case showing that Aquinas’s insights speak profoundly to contemporary controversies. Another chapter treats briefly the place of the Eastern Fathers in Aquinas, a question that has become increasingly important in ecumenical dialogue so as to show that Thomistic theology is not antithetical to reunion with the Orthodox East. In the context of a world plagued by Cartesian dualism and inability to come to terms with the scope of human suffering, two further chapters treat Aquinas’s hylomorphic understanding of the human person and his account of God’s permission of evil (the latter through the lens of Charles Cardinal Journet). The book concludes on a fittingly ecumenical note, as Emery takes up George Lindbeck’s influential reading of Aquinas as a “postliberal” theologian who thereby has an important place in contemporary Protestant-Catholic dialogue. In the hands of Gilles Emery, the work of Thomas Aquinas is shown to contribute profoundly to the task of appreciating and resolving the central theological discussions and controversies of our time.

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