Litchfield IL – House of Television

Litchfield IL – House of Television
Church advertising
Image by myoldpostcards
Back in the pre-Best Buy Days, television stores like this were commonplace in towns large and small. The former Vic’s House of Television is now a house of satellite dishes. Check out the "Hey Look" in the display window. That’s one way to get the attention of passing motorists! The wall-painted sign is advertising Zenith’s System 3, a television line manufactured from the late 1970s until the early 1990s. Zenith is today owned by South Korea’s LG Group.

Litchfield is a city in Montgomery County, and is located off exit 52 on I-55 about halfway between Springfield, Illinois and St. Louis, Missouri. The population of Litchfield was 6,815 at the 2000 Census. Historic U.S. Route 66 runs through the City.

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For more photos of Litchfield, check out my "Litchfield IL (Set)" on the right.

Interested in Central Illinois? Here are my collections and sets relating to the middle section of the Land of Lincoln:

Central Illinois (excluding Springfield)


Springfield and ONLY Springfield


All About Abe (Lincoln)


All Things Political

And for locations beyond Central Illinois, look here:

Beyond Cenral Illinois

Lastly, here are a few more "topical" sets that may be of interest to you:

Barbers & Barber Shops


Vintage Cars & Trucks – Junkers to Classic Collectibles


Everything Wheaten (as in Wheaten Terriers)


Small Town Churches


Things that are Abandoned, Neglected, Weathered, or Rusty

Thank you for visiting my photostream – myoldpostcards

Using Television For Speaking About Religion

Using Television For Speaking About Religion

There are some people who are unable to attend church and find their television is the only outlet they have to hear God’s word. They tune to the community television station on their cable network to attend a weekly worship service and listen to the message about the love of God and the plans that he has for everybody’s life.

The television networks have created a Gospel channel that features clergy from many Faiths around the world and people have the opportunity to tune in at a regularly scheduled time to hear people voice their observations about the life of Christ and even the history of his death. When these clergy are speaking about God they have an authoritative tone to their voice that indicates the power of the Living Word.

There are other people who watch the church television program that are quite able to dress for church, are also lucky enough to own a car that could take them to church on Sunday if they had the mind to go. These people are quite content to use their televisions to see religious services because they like the anonymity that television viewing offers. While someone is speaking about God, these people feel very comfortable about cooking a meal at the same time.

These people quit going to church because something that was said struck a nerve. They still enjoy hearing the philosophical views of many evangelists but do not want to be pressured to contribute to the collection plate of a church that they used to visit only one or two times. They feel that the church is actually asking them to pay a price for hearing someone speak about God, and never seem to get the message about the price that Christ paid on the cross at Calvary.

Using television for speaking about religion is a useful tool that many clergy prefer because it gives them the opportunity to reach more people at one time. People come to the church services that are broadcasted on the television and people at home can see the looks of contentment on their faces throughout the program.

These people are not hiding their faith and ask for no anonymity as they sit in their pew. They want their visit to church that day to count for something so they sit patiently and listen to every word that is spoken. The community church programs make sure that the deaf can hear every word too because they always ensure that someone is standing in the background doing sign language so that the deaf will know what the clergy is speaking about.