Tag Archives: Sutton

Danita Delimont – Churches – Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Greeting Cards-6 Greeting Cards with envelopes

Danita Delimont – Churches – Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Greeting Cards-6 Greeting Cards with envelopes

  • Heavy-duty card stock.
  • Gloss finish exterior
  • Matte finish interior for smudge free writing
  • Cards are creased for easy folding
  • Set of 6 greeting cards; 6 white envelopes included.

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton Greeting Card is a great way to say “thank you” or to acknowledge any occasion. These blank cards are made of heavy-duty card stock with a gloss exterior and a matte interior for smudge free writing. Cards are creased for easy folding and come with white envelopes. Available in sets of 6 and 12.

List Price: $ 14.49

Price: $ 10.49

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – 12 X 18 Inch Garden Flag

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – 12 X 18 Inch Garden Flag

  • Overall dimension is 12″ x 18″; image size is 10″ x 10″
  • Made of 100% single-ply semi-opaque polyester
  • Image is printed on one side, with a lighter image visible on the backside
  • Suitable for hanging from a flag pole (8mm in diameter), on a wall, ceiling, banisters or doors
  • Hanging hardware/pole not included

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton Flag is a creative way to celebrate all year round by adding a little bit of color and fun. Made of 100% single-ply semi-opaque polyester with the image printed on one side; a lighter image will be visible on the backside. Hang using a pole, on the wall, ceiling, banister, and door or anywhere you feel the need to add a splash of color. Hanging hardware/pole not included.

List Price: $ 13.99

Price: $ 9.99

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Toddler Light-Pink-T-Shirt (4T)

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Toddler Light-Pink-T-Shirt (4T)

  • Adult and youth sizes are a blend of 50% cotton, 50% polyester.
  • Toddler sizes are 100% cotton.
  • Available in white, grey, light blue or pale pink.
  • Custom printed image applied.
  • Washing instructions: Do not use bleach, dry on low heat, turn inside out

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton T-Shirt is a great way to show off your true style. Adult and youth sizes are a 50/50 blend of cotton and polyester, toddler sizes are 100% cotton. All sizes are available in white, grey, light blue and pale pink and feature a custom printed image.

List Price: $ 27.54

Price: $ 22.94

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Adult SweatShirt Small

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton – Adult SweatShirt Small

  • Blend of 50% cotton, 50% polyester
  • Washing instructions: Do not use bleach, dry on low heat, turn inside out
  • Available in white
  • Custom printed image applied.
  • Sizes are unisex

Belgium, Liege, wood carving in church pew – EU04 WSU0060 – William Sutton Sweatshirt is a great way to keep warm in style. This 50/50 cotton/poly blend crewneck sweatshirt, featuring a custom printed image, is available in both adult and youth sizes.

List Price: $ 30.99

Price: $ 26.39

IT GETS BETTER – A GAY MORMON’S STORY – MATT SUTTON

My name is Matt Sutton. I am a Gay Mormon, and I am here to tell all the Struggling Young LGBT Kids… IT DOES GET BETTER!!! Don’t get me wrong, your still going to have struggles, but things are going to get better and your going to be able to live with it. Whatever happens to you know is only going to make you stronger in the end. My story is pretty crazy, me ending up gay and mormon. I had a really hard time, worste than most people I know, because it was especially not accepted in the mormon community. I was very much ostracized for everyone, my family looked down on me with shame, I was sent to all kinds of therapists and counselors. It was awful!!! I felt like I didn’t even have a family… and the worste part was NOONE COULD UNDERSTAND ME! Everyone just wanted to change me! I eventually isolated from my family and the church all together. I then looked to find comfort and support elsewhere… I ended up getting involved with the wrong kind of people, and too numb my pain and my feelings of abandonment I fell into drugs and alcohol, became a complete cocaine addict and alcoholic. I did all kinds of incomprehensible demoralizations. I ended up in all kinds of legal trouble. I was a mess. LUCKILY, I was able to get some help, ended up in rehab, and thats when I finally got to know myself and become in acceptance of WHO I AM! I was finally able to mend my relationships with my family and society. TODAY, I am proud of who I am. I have a WONDERFUL LIFE! I have a
Video Rating: 4 / 5

O_15A College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) on the Left and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street in the Center

O_15A College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) on the Left and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street in the Center
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the Foreground

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 20-August-1990.

B_10 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame

B_10 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) (now Renaissance Providence Hotel) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the foreground.

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 17-August-1990.

B_11 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame

B_11 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the foreground.

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 17-August-1990.

B_09 College Hill – Centered on St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the Foreground – Downtown in the Middle

B_09 College Hill – Centered on St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the Foreground – Downtown in the Middle
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Centered on St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – The "Free-Will Baptist Church", home of the Starry Wisdom sect in H. P. Lovecraft’s story, "The Haunter of the Dark." Demolished 04-February-1992. – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the foreground.

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

And Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

Photo taken by Will Hart on 17-August-1990.