Tag Archives: South

Bethel United Church of Jesus Christ Apostolic (20 South Camp Road) Senior Women’s Fellowship Choir

Video Rating: 4 / 5

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Church pews
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

he original organ, made by John Snetzler in London, was installed in 1768. The case, which was altered several times, was refinished and restored to its original configuration in 1994 by Kenneth Jones of Bray, Ireland. Jones built a new 40-stop, 51-rank tracker organ to fit in and behind the Snetzler case. St. Michael’s had one of the first choirs of surpliced boys in this county. The Vestry records mention them as early as 1794.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

Bishop Gunasekaran Samuel chairs a Consecration services in Anglican Church of South India – 2009

The Anglican Church of South India Consecrated 4 Bishops for its Dioceses along with some clergy ordinations in 2009.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Boston – Back Bay: New Old South Church

Boston – Back Bay: New Old South Church
Old Church
Image by wallyg
The Old South Church in Boston, also known as the New Old South Church or Third Church, located at 645 Boylston Street on Copley Square, was built in 1874 to the Venetian Gothic design of Charles Amos Cummings and Willard Thomas Sears. The church building is one of the most significant examples of the impact on American architecture by British culutral theorist and archiectural critic John Ruskin.

This United Church of Christ (Congregational) meeting house is home to one of the older religious communities in the United States, organized by dissenters from Boston’s First Church in 1669, and from that time known as the Third Church in Boston. The congregation first met in their 1670 Cedar Meeting House, and then at the Old South Meeting House. Members of the congregation have included Samuel Adams, , William Dawes, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Sewall, and Phillis Wheatley. In 1773, Samuel Adams gave the signals from the Old South Meeting House for the "war whoops" that started the Boston Tea Party. During the Unitarian Movement of the early 19th cenutry, Old South was the sole Congregational Church in Boston to Adhere to the doctrine of Trinitarianism. In 1816 Old South Church joined with Park Street Church to form the City Mission Society, a social justice society to serve Boston’s urban poor. During the American Civil War, Old South became a recruiting center for the Union Army under minister Jacob Manning.

Construction of the new church began in 1872. The exterior is built primarily of Roxbury conglomerate, or puddingstone, with ornamention of striped arches, tracery, and ironwork. The trademark campanile, or tower, rises to a height of 246-feet and houses the church’s 2,020-pound bell. Designed by Allen and Collens in the 1930’s, it replaced the original tower which had begun to list and had to be dismantled. Centered above the Sanctuary on the east side is a copper the latern, a copper clad cuploa surrounded by twelve ornate gothic arched windows. The interior is of plaster with Italian cherry woodwork. The screen of wooden arches behind the choir was adapted from the Doge’s Palace in Venice. Stained glass windows are by Clayton and Bell of London in 15th century English style.

Old South Church National Register #70000690 (1970)

South Leith Parish Church

South Leith Parish Church
Church furniture
Image by leithlightingfan
There are several lighting columns in South Leith Parish Church graveyard. This one predates all of the other more modern reproductions. The church and its grounds have been A listed by Historic Scotland since 1970 (though there is no specific mention of any historic lighting columns). The current church was built by Thomas Hamilton in 1848. The cast iron lighting column appears Victorian in style. There is no ladder bar to indicate that the column was originally gas so it could have been introduced to the churchyard in the latter Victorian period as an early electric light.

For further info on preserving Leith’s historic lights go to: www.greenerleith.org/greener-leith-news/2012/4/10/leither…

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Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Chairs for church
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

The chancel decoration, executed by Tiffany in 1905, is a half-come design surrounded by ten small Corinthian columns also dating from 1905. The chancel window, installed as a memorial in 1893, shows St. Michael’ casting out the dragon, after Raphael’s painting. The chancel chairs were purchased by the Vestry in 1817. The chancel rail of wrought iron, dating from 1772, is a fine example of English hand work of the period. It was the first important piece of wrought iron to be imported to Charleston.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

Old South Church

Old South Church
Old Church
Image by jpellgen
Built in 1874, the Old South Church is home to one of the oldest religious communities in the United States. This Gothic Revival style building is on the National Register of Historic Places as well as being classified as a National Historic Landmark. The copper cupola was inspired by the design of St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice, Italy.

Old South Church. Boston, Massachusetts.

St Mary’s Bridport – South Street, Bridport – church sign / noticeboard

St Mary’s Bridport – South Street, Bridport – church sign / noticeboard
Chairs for church
Image by ell brown
The town of Bridport in Dorset – it is the gateway to West Bay and the Jurassic Coast.

Down South Street in Bridport.

Church on South Street – St Mary’s Bridport.

Grade A listed.

Parish Church of St Mary, Bridport

1.
5191 SOUTH STREET
(West Side)

Parish Church of
St Mary [formerly
listed under General]

SY 4692 1/1 28.11.50

A GV

2.
Transepts (except for terminal windows) C13. Otherwise late C14 (work in
progress 1397; dedications in 1362, 1403 and 1486). 2 E bays of nave 1858-60
chancel and chancel chapels 1860; architect John Hicks of Dorchester (to
whom Thomas Hardy was apprenticed), see also Nos 78-84 St Andrew s Road.
6 bay nave and aisles, 2 storey porch and outer chapel, transepts, crossing
with crossing tower, chancel and flanking chancel chapels. Perpendicular font,
wood pulpit and stained glass. C13 efigy of reclining knight. Bull
monument in south transept. Brass to Coker (killed in Monmouth’s Rebellion)
in fat Baroque wooden frame. 2 scratched marble tablets (1 by Chideock tomb,
and 1 in St Katherine’s Chapel). Rococo tablet in north transept. C17 oak
chair.

Parish Church of St Mary, the churchyard walls, the War Memorial, and wall to the
Vicarage Garden form a group.

Listing NGR: SY4657792600

Church sign / noticeboard