Tag Archives: pulpits

Is it true the tv pastors call from pulpits exhorting people to come on yahoo answers and misspell atheists?

Question by 2.718281828459045235360287471352662497757247093699: Is it true the tv pastors call from pulpits exhorting people to come on yahoo answers and misspell atheists?
What is the reason for this? Do church people get extra points in heaven every time this word is misspelled on here? Then what?
.

Best answer:

Answer by LARA, age 82
Either that or perhaps it is dyslexia

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life

Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life

Since the 2000 presidential election, debate over the role of religion in public life has followed a narrow course as pundits and politicians alike have focused on the influence wielded by conservative Christians. But what about more mainstream Christians? Here, Steven M. Tipton examines the political activities of Methodists and mainline churches in this groundbreaking investigation into a generation of denominational strife among church officials, lobbyists, and activists. The result is an unusually detailed and thoughtful account that upends common stereotypes while asking searching questions about the contested relationship between church and state.

Documenting a wide range of reactions to two radically different events—the invasion of Iraq and the creation of the faith-based initiatives program—Tipton charts the new terrain of religious and moral argument under the Bush administration from Pat Robertson to Jim Wallis. He then turns to the case of the United Methodist Church, of which President Bush is a member, to uncover the twentieth-century history of their political advocacy, culminating in current threats to split the Church between liberal peace-and-justice activists and crusaders for evangelical renewal. Public Pulpits balances the firsthand drama of this internal account with a meditative exploration of the wider social impact that mainline churches have had in a time of diverging fortunes and diminished dreams of progress.

An eminently fair-minded and ethically astute analysis of how churches keep moral issues alive in politics, Public Pulpits delves deep into mainline Protestant efforts to enlarge civic conscience and cast clearer light on the commonweal and offers a masterly overview of public religion in America.
(20070329)
Since the 2000 presidential election, debate over the role of religion in public life has followed a narrow course as pundits and politicians alike have focused on the influence wielded by conservative Christians. But what about more mainstream Christians? Here, Steven M. Tipton examines the political activities of Methodists and mainline churches in this groundbreaking investigation into a generation of denominational strife among church officials, lobbyists, and activists. The result is an unusually detailed and thoughtful account that upends common stereotypes while asking searching questions about the contested relationship between church and state.

Documenting a wide range of reactions to two radically different events—the invasion of Iraq and the creation of the faith-based initiatives program—Tipton charts the new terrain of religious and moral argument under the Bush administration from Pat Robertson to Jim Wallis. He then turns to the case of the United Methodist Church, of which President Bush is a member, to uncover the twentieth-century history of their political advocacy, culminating in current threats to split the Church between liberal peace-and-justice activists and crusaders for evangelical renewal. Public Pulpits balances the firsthand drama of this internal account with a meditative exploration of the wider social impact that mainline churches have had in a time of diverging fortunes and diminished dreams of progress.

An eminently fair-minded and ethically astute analysis of how churches keep moral issues alive in politics, Public Pulpits delves deep into mainline Protestant efforts to enlarge civic conscience and cast clearer light on the commonweal and offers a masterly overview of public religion in America.
(20070329)

List Price: $ 35.00

Price: $ 35.00

Mega-churches & The Greedy Hirelings in Their Pulpits Part1

The ‘LA Times’ reports Creflo A. Dollar, senior pastor of World Changers Church International, preaches that God will reward his faithful with material riches. It is a gospel that has won the flamboyant, demon-possessed preacher a 25000-strong congregation — and a Rolls-Royce, a multimillion-dollar mansion and a private Gulfstream III jet. Now a Senate committee is investigating whether Dollar and leaders of several other mega-churches have illegally used donations to fund opulent lifestyles. Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) has sent letters to six high-profile mega-churches, including Dollar’s in College Park, Ga., requesting that they hand over records of salaries, expense accounts, credit cards, cars and airplanes.’ Jesus came into the city of Jerusalem on a donkey,’ Grassley said in a telephone interview. ‘Do these ministers really need Bentleys and Rolls-Royces to spread the Gospel?’ Grassley has some other specific concerns. For example, he wants Paula and Randy White, pastors of the Without Walls International Church in Tampa, Fla., to document thier tax-exempt cosmetic surgery. And he wants Joyce Meyer, who runs Joyce Meyer Ministries from Fenton, Mo., to explain the tax-exempt purpose of a 000 ‘commode with marble top.’ Next we will look at a report documenting how the megachurches and pastorpreneurs like Bill Hybels, Rick Warren and Joel Osteen are fleecing the flock’ by offering a luke-warm gospel, giant screen TV’s, rock music & plenty of entertainment.

Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life

Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life

  • ISBN13: 9780226804743
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!

Since the 2000 presidential election, debate over the role of religion in public life has followed a narrow course as pundits and politicians alike have focused on the influence wielded by conservative Christians. But what about more mainstream Christians? Here, Steven M. Tipton examines the political activities of Methodists and mainline churches in this groundbreaking investigation into a generation of denominational strife among church officials, lobbyists, and activists. The result is an unusually detailed and thoughtful account that upends common stereotypes while asking searching questions about the contested relationship between church and state.

Documenting a wide range of reactions to two radically different events—the invasion of Iraq and the creation of the faith-based initiatives program—Tipton charts the new terrain of religious and moral argument under the Bush administration from Pat Robertson to Jim Wallis. He then turns to the case of the United Methodist Church, of which President Bush is a member, to uncover the twentieth-century history of their political advocacy, culminating in current threats to split the Church between liberal peace-and-justice activists and crusaders for evangelical renewal. Public Pulpits balances the firsthand drama of this internal account with a meditative exploration of the wider social impact that mainline churches have had in a time of diverging fortunes and diminished dreams of progress.

An eminently fair-minded and ethically astute analysis of how churches keep moral issues alive in politics, Public Pulpits delves deep into mainline Protestant efforts to enlarge civic conscience and cast clearer light on the commonweal and offers a masterly overview of public religion in America.
(20070329)

List Price: $ 37.50

Price: $ 19.99

Have you asked yourself, were did pulpits, pews, scheduled services, and THE PASORS church come from?

Question by newlife: Have you asked yourself, were did pulpits, pews, scheduled services, and THE PASORS church come from?
When I read the Bible I see that they gathered in homes, there was no head leader, I do read elders (plural) and giftings in the church, no big me, little you crap.

Best answer:

Answer by meoorr
Very interesting question. You’re right – for about 3 centuries they gathered in homes. Pulpits, pews, ministers, sermons, all came much later and were largely influenced by the Roman Empire.

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