Tag Archives: Preparing

Tony preparing for his latest role…

Tony preparing for his latest role…
Church advertising
Image by crumj
Tony was part of the entertainment at our church auction last weekend. He dressed up as something like Bigfoot, a monster called the Wooley Booger who supposedly haunts Camp Magruder, a Methodist camp where we have our church family camp every fall. The auction theme was Camp Going Going Gone, and he was supposed to be a large, hairy prop. He also handed out fliers advertising family camp in October. This is the first of several photos showing his transformation (or as I call it, bringing out his true character).

Tony preparing for his latest role…

Tony preparing for his latest role…
Church advertising
Image by crumj
Tony was part of the entertainment at our church auction last weekend. He dressed up as something like Bigfoot, a monster called the Wooley Booger who supposedly haunts Camp Magruder, a Methodist camp where we have our church family camp every fall. The auction theme was Camp Going Going Gone, and he was supposed to be a large, hairy prop. He also handed out fliers advertising family camp in October. This is the first of several photos showing his transformation (or as I call it, bringing out his true character).

Spanish Workshop for Children Introduces Latest Princeton Center Central NJ Spanish Immersion Program Preparing Young People for Future Academic Success

Princeton, NJ (PRWEB) December 15, 2008

Spanish Workshop for Children, a total Spanish immersion program, has introduced its latest center in Princeton, N.J. This newest center brings Spanish Workshop for Children’s total number of locales to five. The central New Jersey location, housed at Trinity Church in Princeton, joins Blue Bell, Rosemont and Yardley, Pa. as well as Cherry Hill, N.J. on the Spanish Workshop for Children roster. Under the direction of Marcela Summerville, Spanish Workshop for Children enrollees enjoy a distinctive Spanish-teaching methodology and curriculum. Summerville is a two-time Parent’s Choice Award-winning author, has been the co-chair for the ACTFL-LLC-SIG (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) and has been appointed Pennsylvania State Representative of NNELL (National Network of Early Language Learning) since November 2004, where she advocates early language learning.

The city of Princeton, N.J., boasts a long educational tradition. It is the home of a top-rated Ivy League university as well as the Educational Testing Service, which tests and scores students’ competency to enter such prestigious institutions of higher learning. Princeton-area residents don’t have to wait until their children reach high school, however, to avail themselves to all the academic advantages the region has to offer. In fact, they can now start leveraging such opportunities at the toddler and preschool levels by enrolling their future academic stars in Spanish Workshop for Children.

Spanish Workshop for Children positions itself with the slogan “Where a Good Beginning Never Ends,” a mantra that educational statistics prove holds merit. Indeed, according to the College Board, students who average four or more years of foreign language study scored higher on the verbal section of the SAT than those who had studied four or more years of any other subject matter. With its latest Princeton locale, Spanish Workshop for Children affords more children than ever the opportunity to ascend the academic ranks.

Currently, 245 families are enrolled in the total Spanish immersion program, with nearly 80 percent of them having re-enrolled from previous years. The program enjoys such a success rate thanks in large part to its departure from traditional curriculum. Instead, it takes a fun, natural and easy approach to learning a foreign language.

Simon Richter, professor and chair of the Department of German at the University of Pennsylvania, speaks highly of his Spanish Workshop for Children experience. “I’ve never seen total immersion for kids like this. Marcela takes the children on a journey into a Spanish-speaking world that engages their minds, their bodies, their imaginations and their sense of fun. Marcela is the Peter Pan of Spanish-language immersion for children. Our son Toby has been completely captivated.”

Spanish Workshop for Children runs a variety of sessions, with the half-day Preescolar Program being one of the most popular. Winter sessions, including those held at the Princeton location, begin in January 2009.

For more information on Spanish Workshop for Children’s foreign language immersion methodology, visit the program’s Web site at http://spanishworkshopforchildren.com. To learn how your Princeton-area toddler or preschooler can academically benefit from the total Spanish immersion program, contact Marcela Summerville at (610) 489-5595.

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Preparing For Jobs In The Music Industry

Preparing For Jobs In The Music Industry

music jobs, music jobs uk, music industry jobs, classical music jobs, church music jobs

The music industry is undoubtedly one of the ‘sexiest’ fields in which to work, according to a recent survey by the editors of Time magazine. There are music industry jobs that require nearly any skill set that you can bring to the job, and the training required varies with each of the music industry jobs that may interest you. Here are some general guidelines for finding work in music industry jobs.

Love Music.

It’s not a prerequisite for music industry jobs, but loving music of any kind is a definite step in the right direction. While loving music may not be important in a record company accountant’s position, it’s practically required for anyone who works with artists or in promotion.

Check the qualifications for the job.

In general, most jobs in the music industry require at least a two year college degree – with the exception of performers who can get by without a degree if they have talent. Expect that the more involved the job, the higher your level of education and/or experience will need to be. A record promoter may need to demonstrate networking skills or developed contacts in the local music scene, for instance, and a contracts lawyer will obviously require a law degree. Music teachers working for the schools will need to have a teaching license as well as the demonstrated ability to play an instrument.

The best training is on the job training.

For positions like band manager, road work, publicists and promoters, the best training is through an internship or through your own work promoting and/or managing a band on your own. Some publicists and promoters come to the job from their own fanzines, or have developed a network of contacts in radio and advertising through their college or teen year extracurricular activities.

A degree in music is respected in many music industry jobs.

Colleges that specialize in music education like the Berklee School for the Performing Arts offer training in many different aspects of the music industry. You can study music and performance law, accounting for the music industry, and business management for music companies as well as composition, performance and other music-specific jobs.

Join the band.

One of the best training grounds for a career in orchestral music is your school or college band. If you’re already beyond the school years, take advantage of county and city music societies to both train your ear and keep in the practice of playing with others.

Music ministry jobs often require special certifications.

If you have a calling to a job in music ministry, you’ll find that many churches and synagogues require that their full time music minister have pastoral training as well as musical training. The American Guild of Organists and the National Council of Pastoral Musicians offer professional certifications at a number of levels.

Music therapists require a bachelor’s degree in music therapy from one of the approved universities that teach music therapy.

In addition to regular studies, the bachelors in music therapy requires 1200 hours of clinical practice.

The requirements for training for music industry jobs are varied, but this is a brief overview of the training required for some of the major careers in the music industry.

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