Tag Archives: Michael’s

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Church pews
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

he original organ, made by John Snetzler in London, was installed in 1768. The case, which was altered several times, was refinished and restored to its original configuration in 1994 by Kenneth Jones of Bray, Ireland. Jones built a new 40-stop, 51-rank tracker organ to fit in and behind the Snetzler case. St. Michael’s had one of the first choirs of surpliced boys in this county. The Vestry records mention them as early as 1794.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

St Michael’s Church, Baddesley Clinton

St Michael’s Church, Baddesley Clinton
St Church
Image by ell brown
This is the churchyard of St Michael’s Church, Baddesley Clinton, along with the grave stones of those burried there, including members of the Ferrers family.

This is St Michael’s Church, Baddesley Clinton.

The Church of St Michael is a Grade II* listed building.

Church. C13 origins; nave raised and clerestory windows inserted late C15; late
C15 tower; chancel rebuilt and extended 1634. Random coursed stone rubble to
lower part of nave; stone ashlar to chancel, tower, and upper part of nave; old
plain-tile roofs to nave and chancel; tower roof not visible. 3-bay nave, 3-bay
chancel and west tower. 2-centre arched doorway with hood mould and C19
door to centre of nave. 2-light stone mullion window to right of nave. Three
3-light stone mullion windows with cusped lights to clerestory. Tudor-arched
doorway with C19 plank door to left of centre of chancel. 3-light stone mullion
windows to left and right of centre. 5-light Rectilinear tracery window to east
end of chancel. North side: 2-centre arched doorway with hood mould and ribbed
door to centre of nave. Y-tracery window to left of nave. 2-light stone mullion
window with cusped lights to right of nave. Three 3-light stone mullion windows
with cusped lights to clerestory. Tower: 4-centre arched doorway to west side
with plain spandrels and hood mould. 3-light Rectilinear tracery window with
hood mould above doorway. 2-light Rectilinear tracery louvred openings to each
side of top stage of tower. String course to base of tower parapet has carved
water-spouts. Battlemented parapet. Interior: chancel; 3-bay barrel-vaulted roof
with moulded wood ribs. Altar tomb to right to Sir Edward Ferrers (1465-1535)
and his wife Constance, in Tudor-arched recess, having quatrefoil spandrels.
3 panels to tomb with elaborate tracery and armorial bearings. C19 choir stalls.
2-centred chancel arch with chancel screen, dated 1634, having wood panelled
base and strapwork slats above. Nave: 3-bay Perpendicular roof. C19 pulpit, font
and pews. 2-centred arch on octagonal half-columns to tower. East window is C16
in origins but much is probably now mid-C18 restoration. History: Nicholas
Brome, who was responsible for the late C15 work on the church, was lord of the
manor, and carried out the work in expiation of his murder of the priest, whom
he found "chucking his wife under the chin". The church contains a Sarah Green
single manual chamber organ.
(Buildings of England: Warwickshire: 1966, pp80-81; C.J. Baddeley: The Church of
Saint Michael, Baddesley Clinton (guide book) 1970)
[ 54]

St Michael’s Church, Baddesley Clinton – Heritage Gateway

I took one last clean shot without the people in it.

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Chairs for church
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

The chancel decoration, executed by Tiffany in 1905, is a half-come design surrounded by ten small Corinthian columns also dating from 1905. The chancel window, installed as a memorial in 1893, shows St. Michael’ casting out the dragon, after Raphael’s painting. The chancel chairs were purchased by the Vestry in 1817. The chancel rail of wrought iron, dating from 1772, is a fine example of English hand work of the period. It was the first important piece of wrought iron to be imported to Charleston.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

Applefest coming next week at St. Michael’s in Holliston

Applefest coming next week at St. Michael’s in Holliston
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church at 1162 Highland St. in Holliston will host its annual Applefest Fall Fair on Saturday, Oct. 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Read more on Holliston Tab

American Anglican Council files brief for Christ Church
Savannah’s Christ Church is getting help from the American Anglican Council in its attempt to stay on Johnson Square.
Read more on WTOC 11 Savannah

Historic Church Seeks Grant For Repairs
One historic church is looking for some help to repair flood damage.
Read more on WSAZ NewsChannel 3 West Virginia