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First Baptist Church of Arlington, Arlington, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Arlington, Arlington, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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In the 1870s this church was organized at Johnson Station, an early Tarrant County settlement and stagecoach stop. In 1876 the Texas and Pacific Railroad built a line through the area and founded Arlington. The church and other institutions moved to the new town. Worship services were held at several meeting sites before the congregation built a sanctuary at Pecan and Abram Streets in 1917. That Church building burned in 1944, and an auditorium was constructed on South Center Street in 1947. A new sanctuary at this location was added in 1959. (1982)

Saint Mark Baptist Church McKinney Texas Historical Marker

Saint Mark Baptist Church McKinney Texas Historical Marker
Church names
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The congregation was organized in 1879 by two preachers, the Rev. Dick White and a Rev. Jones, who conducted prayer meetings in area homes. The first church services were held on the farm of Isaac Graves, northeast of McKinney. Originally known as the Free Missionary Baptist Church, the name became Saint Mark in 1886. That same year the church purchased this property and built a brush arbor. A one-room frame building served as the first sanctuary. The present brick edifice was constructed in 1960 during the 1942-1974 pastorate of the Rev. B.T. Jones. (1980) Incise on back: Church Families A. Beavers S. Bell Jr. R.GV. Cofield O.H. Ellis E. Jackson J. Jackson R. Jones E. Killion J. Mack B. Martin L. Newsome A.L. Pearson Geo. Pearson E.T. Robinson E. Smith L. Wattley W.J. Wattley Rev. Erie D. Fields, Pastor

First Baptist Church of Rice, Rice, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Rice, Rice, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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On Feb. 21, 1875, three years after a rail line was built to the area, a group of local residents met to organize this congregation. Early worship services were conducted in the community schoolhouse. In 1894 a sanctuary was constructed at this site on land acquired from Rice Institute, a Houston organization founded by railroadman William Marsh Rice, for whom this town was named. For over a century, the First Baptist Church has led in the development of the area. Its role in the community continues to reflect the ideals of its pioneer founders.

First Baptist Church of Farmers Branch, Farmers Branch, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Farmers Branch, Farmers Branch, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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Thomas and Sarah Keenan settled in Farmers Branch in 1842. They established a family cemetery when they buried their infant son on this site the following year. With the Rev. David Myers, the Keenans organized the Union Baptist Church in 1846, meeting in a structure on cemetery property. That group of Baptists moved to nearby Carrollton; in 1870, in order to reestablish Baptist worship in Farmers Branch, twelve members of the Union Baptist Church organized the Farmers Branch Missionary Baptist Church. Services were first held in the Farmers Branch School, which was probably located about two miles east of the cemetery. The first pastor was the Rev. George W. Good, whose parents had settled in the area many years before. By 1877, church membership had grown to 96. Deed records indicate that ownership of the property on this site was transferred from Thomas Keenan to trustees of the Farmers Branch Missionary Baptist Church in 1893. The congregation grew steadily, and many changes took place after 1930. In 1931 a new church building was erected, and another addition was made in 1944. The name of the church was changed to First Baptist Church of Farmers Branch in 1951. An auditorium was erected in 1956, and a church library was established in 1959. As membership continued to increase, new structures were erected, such as two educational buildings in 1960 and 1963 and a new sanctuary in 1986. The First Baptist Church of Farmers Branch supports such organizations as the Woman’s Missionary Union and the brotherhood program. The church follows in the traditions of its ancestors through domestic and foreign mission work, community service, religious education and worship. (1999)

First Baptist Church of Johnson City, Johnson City, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Johnson City, Johnson City, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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In 1879, on July 19-20 or August 16-17, seven members formed the Missionary Baptist Church of Christ, present First Baptist Church. The Rev. James E. Bell (b. 1843) held services in the schoolhouse. Lumber for the original church building, erected here in 1900, was hauled in wagons from Austin. A 5,500-square feet building dedicated in 1951 and destroyed by fire in 1966 was replaced by the present structure in 1968. Some members of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s family attended this church. In 1978 mission work of the church expanded to include sponsorship of Pedernales Valley Mission. (1979)

Trinity Church Historic Site Marker

Trinity Church Historic Site Marker
Trinity Church
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Historic Site – Trinity Church. Newark’s second oldest house of worship was organized in the 1730s, and chartered by the Church of England (forerunnger of the Episcopal Church in America) in 1746. Part of the tower dates from 1743, but most of the present church was built in 1810. It was designed by Captain Josiah James, a leading parishioner, in a medley of styles. Trinity was designated the cathedral of the Diocese of Newark in 1944. It is the nation’s oldest Episcopal cathedral building, and the mother church of many New Jersey parishes. St. Philip’s Church merged with Trinity in 1966. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

First Baptist Church of Jefferson, Jefferson, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Jefferson, Jefferson, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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Organized in 1855 as the Missionary Baptist Church, this congregation chose the Rev. George B. Tucker as its first pastor. Worship services were originally held in the Union House at city park, Freeman Hall, Judge Patillo’s schoolhouse, and the Methodist and Presbyterian churches. The Rev. D. B. Culberson (1796-1862) served as the second pastor, 1857-1859. He was the father of Congressman David B. Culberson (1830-1900) and grandfather of Governor Charles A. Culberson (1855-1925). The fellowship erected a two-story brick church building on this property in 1869. It was the meeting place in May 1874 of the Southern Baptist Convention, with over 1000 in attendance. It was also the site of an 1877 revival led by Evangelist William E. Penn, a member of this congregation. In 1898 the fellowship split. Pat of the members formed Howelltown Baptist Church; the remainder continued to worship in the brick church until about 1917. The Howelltown congregation adopted the name Central Baptist in 1924. After the two groups reunited in 1937 as the First Baptist Church, members restored and reoccupied the 1869 structure. When it burned in 1944, a new church was erected. Educational facilities were added in 1951 and 1973.

First Baptist Church of Grapevine, Texas Historical Marker

First Baptist Church of Grapevine, Texas Historical Marker
First Baptist Church
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Baptist in the Grapevine prairie area began meeting in their own homes as early as 1846. Worship services later were held in a log schoolhouse on what is now Dooley Street in the community of Grapevine. On December 25, 1869, the pioneers gathered to form a Baptist Church. The eighteen charter members chose A.J. Hallford as their first Pastor. The Church’s first sanctuary was completed in 1871. Over the years, First Baptist Church of Grapevine has grown steadily in membership and has provided significant service and leadership to the community. (1984)

“Old Log Church” Cast Iron Historical Marker, Lincoln Highway (Schellsburg, PA)

“Old Log Church” Cast Iron Historical Marker, Lincoln Highway (Schellsburg, PA)
Church search
Image by takomabibelot
"On land granted by John Schell for the purpose of erecting a union church, construction of this primitive log church building was begun in 1806 by the Reformed and Lutheran Congregations of this area." Dedicated in September of 1974.

See also: www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/DOH/markerresults.asp?secid=31&a…

Trinity United Presbyterian Church, Sherman, Texas Historical Marker

Trinity United Presbyterian Church, Sherman, Texas Historical Marker
Church Covenant
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In the 19th century, Protestant denominations began sending representatives into Texas to organize new churches. By 1850, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church had established seven congregations in Grayson County. The following year, the Rev. W.A. Provine led Sherman residents in organizing their own church, which began meeting in 1852 in the Masonic Lodge hall, which was used by several local congregations. After subsequently using space at the Methodist church, the Cumberland congregation constructed its own sanctuary in 1872 on the northwest corner of Travis and Cherry streets. Throughout the early years of the church’s life, regular revivals played an important role. In 1906, after almost a century of separation, the National Cumberland Presbyterian Church rejoined the Presbyterian Church (USA), and individual congregations were griven the choice to follow suit. The Sherman church voted to rejoin but maintained its name, Cumberland Presbyterian Church, until 1909, when it became known as Grace Presbyterian Church. As the church’s membership grew, it built additional and larger facilities at that same site over the next several decades. In 1921, the congregation voted to be known as Central Presbyterian Church, and in the early 1960s, as the congregation moved to a new site in northwest Sherman, the name changed again, to Trinity United Presbyterian Church. Throughout its history, the congregation that began as Sherman’s Cumberland Presbyterian Church emphasized youth, mission and benevolence programs at the local, national and international levels. These efforts continued after the church united in 1995 with Sherman’s First Presbyterian Church, forming Covenant Presbyterian Church. (2005)