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Ten Tips On Getting Music Teacher Jobs

Ten Tips On Getting Music Teacher Jobs

Now that you’re almost done with your education, you may be looking seriously at finding a job as a music teacher for next year. After several years in college, making the transition from college student to working professional isn’t always easy. Here are ten tips on finding and getting music teacher jobs that will help get you on your way to a great career.

1. Start looking early. The best time to find openings in music teacher jobs is in late March and early April, when school departments are hiring for the upcoming school year. During your student teaching months, get your resume and reference letters put together and start shopping your resume around. Be sure that you let teachers, colleagues and friends know that you’re looking for music teacher jobs – other people are your best source of job leads.

2. Decide what type of music teacher jobs you really want. Knowing whether you want to work with elementary school or pre-schoolers rather than high schoolers, or vice versa will help narrow your job search down to manageable proportions.

3. Remember that YOU are responsible for finding a job. The school districts will not come to you – you have to go after them aggressively. Decide where you want to work, and get your resume out to them. Follow up with phone calls and letters to get an interview and be prepared to go in there and wow them in the interview.

4. Networking is one of the most important things you can do to find music teacher jobs. Let your college career office know that you are looking, let your mother know that you are looking and talk about your job hunt when the opportunity arises. You can be even more proactive – assemble a list of people you know who might hear of music teacher jobs that are open and contact them with a pleasant, polite letter letting them know that you’re looking and asking for any advice or information that they can offer.

5. Check the bulletin board at your local schools. This is one of those often overlooked resources. Most school districts advertise all job openings internally before posting job openings publicly. If you’re practice teaching, you’ve got a good reason to be in the school where you can regularly scan the teacher’s bulletin board for information about music teacher jobs and other job openings.

6. Check with placement companies. More and more often, school departments and private schools are turning to job placement agencies to present them with job candidates for more specialized positions like music teacher jobs. You’ll need a good resume and cover letter, and the nerve to pick up the telephone and ask for an interview.

7. Use the Internet to make your search for music teacher jobs easier. If the local teacher’s union has a web site, that’s a great place to start your job search, but don’t leave out the old standards – http://Monster.com, Yahoo’s HotJobs and other big job recruitment sites.

8. Spend some time on your resume. Don’t just slapdash your resume together. Sit down with it and take the time to correlate your job history, education, professional experience and volunteer experience. Remember to keep it brief – but make sure the important information gets in there. In this case, your summer job at McDonald’s may not mean anything at all – but your six years attending band camp, progressing from student to head counselor certainly will.

9. Don’t send your resume out naked. Never assume that your resume will ‘speak for itself’. A cover letter is an important part of your job search package. Once you pick out a couple of music teacher jobs to which you want to apply, personally tailor a cover letter to each school district. The cover letter should be no more than two to three paragraphs, and should include how you heard about the position, the reasons why you think you’d be a good choice for the job, and contact information. You should also make a point of asking for an interview with a sentence like, “I’m very interested in learning more about the vacant music teacher position, and look forward to a chance to discuss how my skills would be an asset in the classroom. I will call early next week to be sure that my resume arrived safely. Thank you for your time and consideration.”

10. At the interview, be prepared with some questions of your own. Make a point of coming up with a list of questions – and bring the list with you so you don’t forget. Some sample questions include, “How many classes per week will I be teaching?” and “Are there any traditional music ensembles or performances that I’ll be expected to prepare students for?”

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

Get Creative To Find Music Production Jobs

Get Creative To Find Music Production Jobs

So you’ve got that degree in Music Production – but after months of scouring the want ads, you’re beginning to wonder if you shouldn’t have backed it up with a minor in Education. Don’t despair yet – you’re a creative person or you wouldn’t have chosen this business to begin with. The secret to finding and getting music production jobs is to use some of that creativity in your job search.

There are three things to keep in mind when doing a creative job search for music production jobs:

1. As many as 90% of the jobs in any media occupation never get advertised through regular channels. The music production companies get enough over the transom resumes that they can pick and choose without advertising.

2. In many music production jobs, networking will be a key part of your job description. If you can’t network to get a job, you’ll have a hard time convincing a hiring manager that you can do the job.

3. Sometimes the best way to get your foot in the door is to intern for a music production company. According to a recent survey conducted by CareerExposure, 94% of employers have offered a full time job to interns when their internship was finished.

Keeping those three things in mind, you can put together a creative music productions job search that will land you the position that you want using the following blueprint.

1. Do your homework. You should know the music production jobs that you’re going after inside out. Read up on the web, visit the library and bookstores and find out all that you can.

2. Start applying your networking skills. Make a list of people you know who may be able to help you. Don’t forget to include people like your ex-teachers, business acquaintances and people you know through other people. Did you do sound levels for a band? Have you interned for a publisher? Have you got a chance to attend a media symposium? Those are all important contacts for you when you’re trying to network your way into music production jobs.

Boldness is an important skill to cultivate here. Ask for letters of introduction, or for permission to use someone’s name when you contact another. It’s amazing how quickly you’ll get results with a simple statement like, “Hi, Mr. Producer, my name is Interested Party. My professor, Ms. In-The-Know suggested that I call you when I told her that I’m interested in an internship with your company. Do you have a few moments to talk with me about that now, or is there a better time to call you?”

3. All right, you’re not quite that bold? There are several different methods of approach you can use to contact people who hold the keys to music production jobs.

– Mail is the most traditional method. Once you’ve researched enough to know what companies you want to work for, and who makes hiring decisions there, you can mail a resume along with an excellent cover letter. Chances are though, that you’ll have to follow up on your initial mail. Remember point #1 above – music production companies get loads of over the transom resumes.

– Email is a second option, and is a reasonable way to follow up as well. If you’ve sent your resume by mail, wait a few days and then follow up with an email to the hiring manager stating that you’re following up on your mailed resume and are very interested in discussing possible career options within his or her company. If you haven’t, send a cover letter and resume via email, and follow up in a few days with a second email.

– Telephone calls may be scary, but they are one of the quickest ways to get through to the person you want to speak with. Keep in mind that your phone call is an interruption to the hiring manager’s day – be pleasant, be brief and be direct.

The secret to finding and getting music production jobs is being bold enough to get yourself out there and sell your skills and abilities. With only 10% of the available jobs ever being offered openly in the classifieds, it’s the only way that you’ll ever know what music production jobs are available.

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

25 Music Jobs That Most People Don’t Know About

25 Music Jobs That Most People Don’t Know About

You may have heard that music jobs are almost impossible to find, especially if you’re young and just starting out. While it may be true that few aspiring musicians will reach the top of the charts, there are hundreds of thousands of music jobs available. Some are for performers, some for teachers, and some for support staff for musicians and performers. Musicians and others in the music industry may work in production, performance, promotion, and education – even medicine. I promised you 25 music jobs that most people don’t know about – but that’s not technically true. Many of these are jobs that people know about – but don’t consider when they think of ‘music jobs’. Ready for the list? Here we go:

Music Jobs for Songwriters:

A Staff Songwriter works for a record or media company and writes songs for the artists signed by the label.

A Freelance Songwriter writes and markets his or her own songs. Your hours are your own, but you’ll have to work a lot of them to get your songs heard.

A Lyricist writes just the words to songs. He may team up with a composer, or be teamed up with one by a music production company.

A Jingle Writer writes those catchy ads that you hear on the television and radio – you know, the ones that get stuck in your head for days. A jingle writer may not become a famous household name – but he or she will always find work.

Music Jobs in Publishing:

A Music Publisher finds and acquires the copyrights to songs with the intent of licensing or selling them to record companies and musicians.

A Copyright/Licensing Administrator (,000 – ,000) manages the licensing and copyrights for a music publishing company.

A Music Editor (,000 – ,000) works closely with the composer to document, organize and time cues for the musicians in a project.

A Notesetter (,000 – ,000) transcribes music from audio to the page.

Music Jobs in the Record Business

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Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

Networking To Find Music Education Jobs

Networking To Find Music Education Jobs

For those most passionate about their music, a job in music education is a natural fit. Far from being a case of “those who can’t do, teach”, those who take music education jobs are talented not only as artists but as teachers who want to pass their love of music on to another generation, to ensure that there is always music in the world.

Once upon a time, a degree in music education was seen as a ‘fallback option’- the job that would always be there if a performing or production career didn’t work out. That time is long gone now as states have cut funding for enrichment education across the country. While the job outlook for music teachers is still good, the Occupational Outlook Handbook says that jobs for musicians and teachers will grow at about average or a little faster than average rates through 2014 – school departments, private institutions and universities have the luxury of being able to be choosy about whom they hire to fill music education jobs.

One of the best ways to hear about music education jobs and openings is to establish a network of contact within the music education community. While basic networking is good, there are ways to network more effectively to concentrate your focus on finding and improving your chances of being hired for music education jobs.

Network locally.

Lucky you, you actually have three different sources of local networking that can help you narrow your job search focus. As an educator, get involved in local organizations for teachers and get your name out there. If you’ve made contacts while interning and practice-teaching, keep up with them, and ask their advice and guidance in your career path. By all means, let them and others know that you’re looking for a job in music education. Other teachers are often the first to know that one of their own is leaving.

School department contacts are invaluable.

In most cities, the school department must post vacancies internally before advertising them to the general public. Those vacancies are often posted on a bulletin board in each school within the district. Let teacher friends and contacts know that you’re looking and ask them to keep an eye out for you. Knowing that a vacancy is posted internally can give you a leg up on the competition and cue you to submit your resume and cover letter for music education jobs before they’re advertised.

Network online.

Join national and local music teachers associations online, particularly those that hold regular events, symposiums and have a discussion board. Many of them post job openings for members, and more than a few allow members to post job leads and requests for job leads on their boards. Some organizations that you might consider joining include:

Technology Institute for Music Educators (http://www.ti-me.org/)

Music Teachers National Association (http://www.mtna.org)

Teachers.net Chat boards (http://teachers.net/mentors/music/)

The National Association for Music Education (http://www.menc.org/)

Keep in mind that in networking, you get out what you put in. Don’t just join a group and start soliciting for music education jobs. Look for what you can offer – the more you become involved the more visible you’ll become and the more willing others will be to recommend jobs to you.

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

Seven Music Related Jobs In UK Business

Seven Music Related Jobs In UK Business

The music scene is alive and well – thriving even – in the UK. While there are thousands of artists dreaming of their big break, the music industry offers far more to the job hunter than the life of a performer. All those bands and singers and musicians need a support framework, after all. If you’re a music lover looking for music related jobs in UK companies, there’s no lack of positions open to you. Here are just ten music related jobs in UK production, broadcasting and media that are in demand.

Music Publicist

Someone has to get the word out about new music. A music publicist works with the media to be sure that artists are getting publicity to boost sales of their music and their value to a recording label.

Label Manager

A label manager works for a recording company and facilitates the releases of new music by artists recording for a particular label. In this music related job in UK recording, you’ll be working as a liaison between the various departments of the recording company to make sure that all the details are covered for a smooth release of CDs and digital singles.

Management Assistant

No matter what the industry, there’s always a need for management assistants to deal with daily administrative duties from filing invoices to setting up interviews and hotel rooms for touring artists to updating the company website. It may not sound like the most exciting music related job in UK industry, but it’s a great entry level job that will get your foot in the door. In many companies, management assistants easily move into other positions because of their experience in the music business.

Digital Research Analyst

Music companies have always employed market analysts to follow the latest trends in music and help position the company’s artists and assets to best ride the wave to success. The digital revolution rings in new changes nearly every day, and the market analyst position is giving way to a digital analyst who keeps a finger on the pulse of the market, analyzes new technology and emerging trends and forecasts the implications for the company’s products. The position requires experience and skill both in the music industry and in management.

Online Editorial Manager

In today’s digital age, an Internet presence is a total necessity for any music company. In addition to publicists, managers and PR people, there are music related jobs in UK media companies that focus on web production. From producing copy for artist profiles and stories to creating new media presentations for streaming and downloading, there are jobs for music professionals with web and digital experience.

Junior Events Producer

Live events are the heart of the music industry. From creating a schedule to ensuring that all the guests arrive on time to deciding on the invitation list so that all the right media are including, the events producer plays a key role. Junior events producers work under an events producer helping to manage aspects of the planning and execution of live events.

Intern

Internships at recording studios, radio stations and event venues are an excellent way to get to know the music industry and make valuable contacts. While the pay for an internship may be low, interns often have the chance to work on exciting projects as they learn. And in at least one recent survey, over 90% of companies who use interns say that they often hire on an intern full time when the internship period has ended.

There are many more music related jobs in UK companies, ranging from clerical work to throwing parties. If you’re looking for music related jobs in the UK, you’ll find many specialty web sites specifically for jobs in the entertainment and music business.

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

How To Find Jobs In Music

How To Find Jobs In Music

Have you always dreamed about working with music, but weren’t sure where to look for jobs in music and the music industry? The good news is that there are a lot more jobs in music than most people think. Performing positions include working with a studio band, playing with an orchestra and playing with a band at weddings, dances and local clubs. Outside performing, there are many other jobs in music that help support musicians from education through selling their music. The bad news is that those jobs in music are a little harder to find than most jobs. If you’re hoping to score yourself one of those jobs in music here are some hints and tips to help you along.

1. Yes, you’ll find some jobs in music in the newspaper ads.

Look under Professional in the Sunday job listings for the best luck, but ads for companies hiring in the music business are few and far between. You’ll have far better luck if you subscribe to some of the industry’s professional papers and magazines. If you’re looking for a job teaching music, for instance, regularly check the job listings in papers aimed at teachers and education professionals.

2. Internet job search sites are a good place to find jobs in music…

…but skip the big name sites. http://Monster.com and HotJobs! tend to attract hordes of applicants – which the music companies have already. One difference is music teaching and music therapy jobs. If you’re looking for jobs in music therapy or education, the big boards are likely to have far more job leads for you than they will for performers. The same holds true for those seeking jobs in accounting, management or advertising within the music industry. Even then, though, you’ll have better luck at job sites aimed directly at performers and the music industry like http://www.performingjobs.com and http://www.findagig.com.

3. Do some research and approach the companies where you’d like to work directly.

It takes a lot of nerve, but then, that’s what this business is all about, isn’t it? If you’re serious about finding jobs in music production, performance or promotion, you need to show the hiring agents you have what it takes. If you can’t promote yourself, why would they think you can promote someone else? Get out there and do your research to find record labels, production companies and indie companies that you’d like to work with, and then get your resume out into the hands of the people who make the hiring decisions.

4. For teaching and education jobs, approach school departments directly.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs in music education are going to be one of the fastest growing segments of the music industry through 2014. If your ambition is to teach music, organize a school band or head up a school orchestra, the direct approach is the best. Research school departments to find out which are (or may be) hiring, and find out the names of the people who make the decisions on hiring music professionals for the schools. Try to make personal contact before sending your resume so that when your resume arrives on the desk, they’ll already be looking for it.

5. Networking is the one strategy that always works.

Especially in jobs in music promotion and production, where your value lies in how well you can network to get the word out about the bands that you’re promoting. Join local professional associations, hook up with agents and performers and get to know the movers and shakers in your local music scene. That’s the best way to get your foot in the door.

6. Take advantage of school resources.

If you’re in school, take advantage of school resources to get placements as an intern with a radio station, production company or other media company. On the job experience is invaluable in music jobs.

7. Be persistent.

The music industry is volatile and ever changing. The company that isn’t hiring today could be looking for five new publicists tomorrow. Keep on top of job openings in the music industry by checking back on directory and job listings often.

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

Training For Music Industry Jobs

Training For Music Industry Jobs

The music industry is undoubtedly one of the ‘sexiest’ fields in which to work, according to a recent survey by the editors of Time magazine. There are music industry jobs that require nearly any skill set that you can bring to the job, and the training required varies with each of the music industry jobs that may interest you. Here are some general guidelines for finding work in music industry jobs.

Love Music.

It’s not a prerequisite for music industry jobs, but loving music of any kind is a definite step in the right direction. While loving music may not be important in a record company accountant’s position, it’s practically required for anyone who works with artists or in promotion.

Check the qualifications for the job.

In general, most jobs in the music industry require at least a two year college degree – with the exception of performers who can get by without a degree if they have talent. Expect that the more involved the job, the higher your level of education and/or experience will need to be. A record promoter may need to demonstrate networking skills or developed contacts in the local music scene, for instance, and a contracts lawyer will obviously require a law degree. Music teachers working for the schools will need to have a teaching license as well as the demonstrated ability to play an instrument.

The best training is on the job training.

For positions like band manager, road work, publicists and promoters, the best training is through an internship or through your own work promoting and/or managing a band on your own. Some publicists and promoters come to the job from their own fanzines, or have developed a network of contacts in radio and advertising through their college or teen year extracurricular activities.

A degree in music is respected in many music industry jobs.

Colleges that specialize in music education like the Berklee School for the Performing Arts offer training in many different aspects of the music industry. You can study music and performance law, accounting for the music industry, and business management for music companies as well as composition, performance and other music-specific jobs.

Join the band.

One of the best training grounds for a career in orchestral music is your school or college band. If you’re already beyond the school years, take advantage of county and city music societies to both train your ear and keep in the practice of playing with others.

Music ministry jobs often require special certifications.

If you have a calling to a job in music ministry, you’ll find that many churches and synagogues require that their full time music minister have pastoral training as well as musical training. The American Guild of Organists and the National Council of Pastoral Musicians offer professional certifications at a number of levels.

Music therapists require a bachelor’s degree in music therapy from one of the approved universities that teach music therapy.

In addition to regular studies, the bachelors in music therapy requires 1200 hours of clinical practice.

The requirements for training for music industry jobs are varied, but this is a brief overview of the training required for some of the major careers in the music industry.

Rita Henry is a contributing editor for Jobs In Music, the leading job and resource site for the Music Industry. Interested in receiving only the hottest Music job listings weekly for free? To learn more visit Jobs In Music.

Preparing For Jobs In The Music Industry

Preparing For Jobs In The Music Industry

music jobs, music jobs uk, music industry jobs, classical music jobs, church music jobs

The music industry is undoubtedly one of the ‘sexiest’ fields in which to work, according to a recent survey by the editors of Time magazine. There are music industry jobs that require nearly any skill set that you can bring to the job, and the training required varies with each of the music industry jobs that may interest you. Here are some general guidelines for finding work in music industry jobs.

Love Music.

It’s not a prerequisite for music industry jobs, but loving music of any kind is a definite step in the right direction. While loving music may not be important in a record company accountant’s position, it’s practically required for anyone who works with artists or in promotion.

Check the qualifications for the job.

In general, most jobs in the music industry require at least a two year college degree – with the exception of performers who can get by without a degree if they have talent. Expect that the more involved the job, the higher your level of education and/or experience will need to be. A record promoter may need to demonstrate networking skills or developed contacts in the local music scene, for instance, and a contracts lawyer will obviously require a law degree. Music teachers working for the schools will need to have a teaching license as well as the demonstrated ability to play an instrument.

The best training is on the job training.

For positions like band manager, road work, publicists and promoters, the best training is through an internship or through your own work promoting and/or managing a band on your own. Some publicists and promoters come to the job from their own fanzines, or have developed a network of contacts in radio and advertising through their college or teen year extracurricular activities.

A degree in music is respected in many music industry jobs.

Colleges that specialize in music education like the Berklee School for the Performing Arts offer training in many different aspects of the music industry. You can study music and performance law, accounting for the music industry, and business management for music companies as well as composition, performance and other music-specific jobs.

Join the band.

One of the best training grounds for a career in orchestral music is your school or college band. If you’re already beyond the school years, take advantage of county and city music societies to both train your ear and keep in the practice of playing with others.

Music ministry jobs often require special certifications.

If you have a calling to a job in music ministry, you’ll find that many churches and synagogues require that their full time music minister have pastoral training as well as musical training. The American Guild of Organists and the National Council of Pastoral Musicians offer professional certifications at a number of levels.

Music therapists require a bachelor’s degree in music therapy from one of the approved universities that teach music therapy.

In addition to regular studies, the bachelors in music therapy requires 1200 hours of clinical practice.

The requirements for training for music industry jobs are varied, but this is a brief overview of the training required for some of the major careers in the music industry.

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