Tag Archives: Island

Treasure Island DVD

Treasure Island DVD

  • Treasure Island DVD
  • Kingdom of God
  • Miles McPherson Rock Church
  • Pastor, Speaker, Bible Teacher, Leader

This four-part series on stewardship is a dynamic tool to help you live your life with the Kingdom of God as the goal. Watch and learn.

Disc 1: Island Hopping
Disc 2: The Treasure Island Diet
Disc 3: Treasure Hunt
Disc 4: Master Quiz

List Price: $ 6.25

Price: $ 6.25

Gravestone for Father Sebastian Englert, OFM Capuchin, Iglesia Hanga Roa, the Roman Catholic Church in Hanga Roa, Easter Island, Chile

Gravestone for Father Sebastian Englert, OFM Capuchin, Iglesia Hanga Roa, the Roman Catholic Church in Hanga Roa, Easter Island, Chile
Roman Church
Image by Uncommon Fritillary

A PICTORIAL GUIDE TO THE 7 (SEVEN) CHURCHES OF THE APOCALYPSE (THE REVELATION TO ST. JOHN) AND THE ISLAND OF PATMOS OR A PILGRIM’S TOUR GUIDE TO THE 7 (SEVEN) CHURCHES OF THE BIBLE IN ANATOLIA, TURKEY

A PICTORIAL GUIDE TO THE 7 (SEVEN) CHURCHES OF THE APOCALYPSE (THE REVELATION TO ST. JOHN) AND THE ISLAND OF PATMOS OR A PILGRIM’S TOUR GUIDE TO THE 7 (SEVEN) CHURCHES OF THE BIBLE IN ANATOLIA, TURKEY

The Seven Churches in the Revelation to John were located in seven cities that can still be found today in modern Turkey. This book provides one of the best pictorial guides available on the subject. 144 photos and 162 pages take you step by step from the Island of Patmos, where St. John saw his vision, around the Ring Road to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and finally to Laodicea.

List Price: $ 29.95

Price: $ 20.67

O_15A College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) on the Left and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street in the Center

O_15A College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) on the Left and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street in the Center
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the Foreground

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 20-August-1990.

B_10 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame

B_10 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) (now Renaissance Providence Hotel) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the foreground.

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 17-August-1990.

B_11 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame

B_11 College Hill – Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) (Federal Hill) – 352 Atwells Avenue (at Sutton Street) and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) (Downtown) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame
roman church
Image by California Cthulhu (Will Hart)
Looking West from Prospect Terrace – St. John’s Roman Catholic Church (1871) – 352 Atwells Avenue and Rhode Island State House (1895-1904) – 90 Smith Street – as Frame. The Masonic Temple (1929) at 5 Avenue of the Arts is just to the left of the State House. – The House at Pratt and Bowen Streets is in the foreground.

——————————–

H. P. Lovecraft enjoyed spending warm afternoons reading and writing here; and he was one of the park’s most frequent visitors. The view from here was also one of Lovecraft’s favorites of Providence; and is beautifully described in "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward." It’s easy to see why this was one of his favorite haunts; and has now become one of the favorite haunts and photo spots for his fans.

Lovecraft might have been describing his own childhood, instead of that of the young Charles Dexter Ward, when he wrote the following as part of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward": "The nurse used to stop and sit on the benches of Prospect Terrace to chat with policemen; and one of the child’s first memories was of the great westward sea of hazy roofs and domes and steeples and far hills which he saw one winter afternoon from that great railed embankment, and violet and mystic against a fevered, apocalyptic sunset of reds and golds and purples and curious greens. The vast marble dome of the State House stood out in massive silhouette, its crowning statue haloed fantastically by a break in one of the tinted stratus clouds that barred the flaming sky."

——————————–

And Lovecraft’s description of St. John’s in "The Haunter of the Dark" still says it the best, "Of all the distant objects on Federal Hill, a certain huge, dark church most fascinated Blake. It stood out with especial distinctness at certain hours of the day, and at sunset the great tower and tapering steeple loomed blackly against the flaming sky. It seemed to rest on especially high ground; for the grimy facade, and the obliquely seen north side with sloping roof and the tops of great pointed windows, rose boldly above the tangle of surrounding ridgepoles and chimney-pots. Peculiarly grim and austere, it appeared to be built of stone, stained and weathered with the smoke and storms of a century and more. The style, so far as the glass could show, was that earliest experimental form of Gothic revival which preceded the stately Upjohn period and held over some of the outlines and proportions of the Georgian age."

——————————–

The former Masonic Temple building (never completed due to construction stopping at the time of the Great Depression in 1929) is now the Renaissance Providence Hotel (opened 2007), a great symbol of the success of the Most Endangered Properties List. After being on the List for ten years, all of Providence was able to watch this “white elephant” transform into a luxury hotel. This project has been called “the largest historic restoration project in Rhode Island history”.

Photo taken by Will Hart on 17-August-1990.

Rock Island Restaurants offer coupons in Peoria Dining Tour

Rock Island Restaurants offer coupons in Peoria Dining Tour

If you are watching your budget, but still want to eat out occasionally, then you need the 2009-2010 Peoria Dining Tour book.

 

The Peoria Dining Tour book contains more than 300 valuable “Buy One – Get One Free” coupons valid at more than 100 Rock Island Restaurants and Restaurants Moline. You get all this value for only for the entire book, now in its 21st consecutive year.

 

Each printed coupon includes information on the restaurant’s money-saving offer, along with its name, address and phone number. Helpful hints about tipping your servers, days that the coupon is valid, as well as any minor restrictions, also are printed on the coupons. The back of the coupon lists more valuable information such as house specialties, banquet facilities and other advantages for Restaurants Moline and Rock Island Restaurants.

 

Whatever your favorite cuisine, you’ll find Rock Island Restaurants that serve it in the Peoria Dining Tour book. Along with coupons for all your favorite national chain restaurants, you’ll find such Restaurants Moline favorites as Adams Street Café, Par-a-dice Hotel Casino, Angie’s Family Restaurant & Buffet, Pita’s Mediterranean Wraps, Bar Louie, Ponte Vecchio, Bellacino’s, The Galley, Rhythm Kitchen, Richard’s on Main Street, Burger Barge, Butler’s Chicken, Haddad’s, Café Evergreen, Hickory River, Smokehouse, Carnegie’s 501, The Chateau, Jane’s Ice Box, Spotted Cow, Chicago Hut, Kaiserhof, Club Lacon, Cracklin’ Jakes, Crusen’s, Culver’s, Vertucci Chicago Style Eats, Michael’s Italian Feast, Mister G’s Chicago Style Hotdogs, Water Street Café, and Youssef’s Deli.

 

Not only are you helping yourself when you purchase the 2009-2010 Peoria Dining Tour book, you’re helping your community as well. Dozens of schools, churches and other community organizations sell the Peoria Dining Tour books to support local projects that benefit everyone.

 

Among the organizations selling this valuable book with coupons for Rock Island Restaurants and Restaurants Moline are women’s groups such as the Peoria Women’s Club, United Methodist Women of East Hanna, Lutheran Women of Great Peoria Area, Junior League of Peoria and Women’s Council of Realtors.

 

You probably already know someone who’s in community clubs such as Optimist, Kiwanis and Lions that sell Peoria Dining Tour books with valuable coupons for Rock Island restaurants and restaurants Moline.

 

Should you prefer to contribute through a local church, you can obtain a Peoria Dining Tour book from one of many denominations, such as Saint Edward Church, Bethel Memorial United Church of Christ, Saint Monica’s Church, East Peoria Hands of Christ, East Peoria Sunnyland Christian Church CWF, Catholic Singles Adults Club Peoria, Forrest Hill United Methodist Church Peoria, 1st Christian Church – Peoria, 1st Presbyterian Church – Princeville.

 

If you’d like to help a youth organization with your purchase of a Peoria Dining Tour book, you can buy yours from Boy Scout Troop 65 in Groveland, 1st Free Methodist Youth Peoria, Tremont United Methodist Childcare or schools such as Germantown Hills School PTO in Metamora, Peoria Christian School, Peoria Heights High School Scholastic Team or Washington HS Band Boosters.

 

A full list of participating organizations, along with telephone numbers to call for buying Peoria Dining Tour books, is available on the book web site. Check it out today to find a community organization near you offering this great value in dining out!

Enjoy a good meal and serve your community at the same time. Check with a local church, school or civic club to buy your 2009-2010 Peoria Dining Tour book and check out your options for Restaurants Moline or Rock Island Restaurants.