Tag Archives: Iron

Church of the Holy Trinity Episcopal, Philadelphia – US39 ECL0003 – Ellen Clark – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Church of the Holy Trinity Episcopal, Philadelphia – US39 ECL0003 – Ellen Clark – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

  • Heat transfer is transparent and should be applied only to white or light colored material
  • Material used for heat transfer should be able to withstand high heat.
  • Not true color until transferred.
  • Application instructions included
  • Washing instructions: Do not use bleach, dry on low heat, turn inside out

Church of the Holy Trinity Episcopal, Philadelphia – US39 ECL0003 – Ellen Clark Iron on Heat Transfer is a great way to jazz up a plain T-shirt, pillow case or any other light color fabric. The transfer is transparent and should be applied only to white or light colored material suitable to withstand high heat. Available in 6″, 8″ and 10″. Color not true until transferred; home iron instructions included. Wash inside out using mild detergent and dry on low heat.

List Price: $ 15.99

Price: $ 11.99

These Are My Church Clothes Name Novelty Embroidered Iron On Applique Patch FD

These Are My Church Clothes Name Novelty Embroidered Iron On Applique Patch FD

  • Iron on Embroidered patch.
  • Size is about 3 1/4″ wide x 1 1/2″ tall.

Iron on Embroidered patch. Size is about 3 1/4″ wide x 1 1/2″ tall.

List Price: $ 3.99

Price: $ 3.99

Some Red Candle Holders With Seven Lit Candles in The Catholic Church in St. George, Utah – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Some Red Candle Holders With Seven Lit Candles in The Catholic Church in St. George, Utah – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Some Red Candle Holders With Seven Lit Candles in The Catholic Church in St. George, Utah Iron on Heat Transfer is printed on a 8 by 8 inch commercial quality high resolution heat transfer paper, available for white and light material applications only. Heat transfer is shipped with the home use instructions for use with a home iron.

List Price: $ 15.99

Price: $ 11.99

Church Search Committee Evaluating Ministers – 6×6 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Church Search Committee Evaluating Ministers – 6×6 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Church Search Committee Evaluating Ministers Iron on Heat Transfer is printed on a 8 by 8 inch commercial quality high resolution heat transfer paper, available for white and light material applications only. Heat transfer is shipped with the home use instructions for use with a home iron.

List Price: $ 13.99

Price: $ 11.99

Dracula on the Church Outreach Committee – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Dracula on the Church Outreach Committee – 10×10 Iron On Heat Transfer For White Material

Dracula on the Church Outreach Committee Iron on Heat Transfer is printed on a 8 by 8 inch commercial quality high resolution heat transfer paper, available for white and light material applications only. Heat transfer is shipped with the home use instructions for use with a home iron.

List Price: $ 15.99

Price: $ 11.99

“Old Log Church” Cast Iron Historical Marker, Lincoln Highway (Schellsburg, PA)

“Old Log Church” Cast Iron Historical Marker, Lincoln Highway (Schellsburg, PA)
Church search
Image by takomabibelot
"On land granted by John Schell for the purpose of erecting a union church, construction of this primitive log church building was begun in 1806 by the Reformed and Lutheran Congregations of this area." Dedicated in September of 1974.

See also: www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/DOH/markerresults.asp?secid=31&a…

Vulcan the Iron Man

Vulcan the Iron Man
Church advertising
Image by K. W. Sanders
In ancient times, Vulcan was the Roman god of the Forge. What does an ancient god have to do with a modern city? Birmingham was founded in 1871 and it grew largely because of its abundance of raw materials for making iron and steel. Because of its quick growth, by 1900, Birmingham was known as the "Magic City".

The city’s leaders wanted to advertise the Birmingham to the world, so they commissioned the Italian sculptor Giuseppe Moretti to make a statue of Vulcan for the World’s Fair in St. Louis. Mr. Moretti completed the mold of the statue in just six months in a large, abandoned church in New Jersey. The mold, in two pieces, was shipped to Birmingham. These were then used by the Birmingham Steel and Iron Company to cast the statue in iron. There are 21 pieces to the statue. It was commissioned on June 7, 1904.

At the end of the World’s Fair, in 1905, the statue was dismantled and hauled to Birmingham by train. The status was erected at the Alabama State Fairgrounds, which was to be a temporary home, but 30 years later, he still stood there. In May 1939, Vulcan was moved to Vulcan Park where he stands atop Red Mountain today. Funds were raised starting in 1999 to return Vulcan to his original glory and in 2003, the process was completed.