Tag Archives: give

Would Republicans feel better about taxes if we gave them a gathering place to give and people will see them?

Question by Growth vs Oil: Would Republicans feel better about taxes if we gave them a gathering place to give and people will see them?
One thing I have noticed is that most conservatives do not like to give unless they are receiving acknowledgment that you gave. Jesus fish in a company ad, flare up at the gas station with your name on it, your Church name on your car etc. They don`t even know they are doing it for self. Why do conservatives give more then Liberals, there is a paper trail when conservatives give.

Best answer:

Answer by El Tecolote
Is this the way you justify the fact that conservatives give more than liberals in charity? You are nothing but a spin-monster and a fvcking apologist, and you can’t even see your own words proving that. I’m done for today; I do consider you guys friends, but you’re pissing me off right now.

Liberals can’t figure out that the poor end spends the rich end’s money all day, through the use of taxes and through the use of charity, and that liberals are the ones giving just so they can get the damn tax write-offs. Conservatives are the ones giving of their TIME, which cannot be taxed. God, you people and your justifications for why the right could ever possibly be on the upper end of something make me sick sometimes.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Is it safe to give your address on an Internet registration?

Question by Chris: Is it safe to give your address on an Internet registration?
I was on the universal life church website and it had a spot to become an ordained minister. I was going to do it but a required answer is your address, I’m not so sure if I should give them it. No rude answers please. Thought?

Best answer:

Answer by Amanda
i believe that it would be ok to give them your address because the website is credible: it ends in .org which is reliable it has a sponsor it has an author and provides with the last date it was updated all of these things show that it is safe to give them your address

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Does the repeal of DADT give conservative christians something to stew about in their church pews tomorrow?

Question by : Does the repeal of DADT give conservative christians something to stew about in their church pews tomorrow?

You mean love thy neighbor unless that neighbor is gay right?

Best answer:

Answer by Primo
No. Christians churches teaches people to love thy neighbor, There goes your theory

EPIC FAIL

What do you think? Answer below!

Book Review: Give Us Grace: an Anthology of Anglican Prayers by Christopher L. Webber

Book Review: Give Us Grace: an Anthology of Anglican Prayers by Christopher L. Webber

Useful book for people interested in reading, using prayer

This is a book that I read, but more I use for prayer. I grant many of the prayers by the well known and should be known Anglicans in this book are old. And their language may be unusual to us moderns, at least to an extent, but they are useful and meaningful.

I bought this hardback to have access to prayers. I had read a biography of Terry Waite, the Anglican held captive some years ago in Iran. He said of his captivity, that one thing that held him was staying with prayers he knew from his prayer book. Albeit I have The Book of Common Prayer, and I say those prayers from it as do many Episcopalians. I thought to myself that I needed more, and though I don’t believe that Terry Waite, a devout man, only said those prayers from his prayer book, and none of his own, nonetheless it is a good idea to have a source of prayer like the Anthology as also starting point and inspiration. Those who wish to widen their scope will find this a useful book, one full of history of the Anglican Church.

Say you are perusing the book, rather than reading it from one cover to the other, you will find all kinds of interesting prayers. Some are long. There is John Donne, who says prayers before various sacraments, like marriage. He is of course giving a sermon at the marriage. Here is some text to give you a taste of the language you may encounter. This from the time of 1571 to 1631:

“O Eternall and most gracious God, who hast promised to hearken to the prayers of thy people, when they pray towards thy house, though they be absent from it, worke more effectually upon us, who are personally met in this thy house, in this place consecrated to they worship. Enable us, O Lord so to see thee…”

The language is to this reader most moving and lovely. The book has many such samples of prayer. Here is another sample, this from Jeremy Taylor:

“An Act of Contrition…Lord, thou shalt find my heart full of cares and worldly desires, cheated with love of riches, and neglact of holy things…”

I was introduced to prayers from the New Zealand Prayer Book by a minister, and I was happy to find some of those prayers in this book, which Episcopalians may find a good source of history and interesting reading. There is a text before the prayers of each person who is quoted that tells of that persons life, and the years they lived. The quotes from the New Zealand book are too lengthy for here, but this excerpt about the night:

“The night is dark/Let our fears of the darkness of the world and of our own lives rest in you.” “The night is quiet./Let the quietness of your peace enfold us,/all dear to us,/and all who have no peace.”

That is a modern, contemporary prayer from their book.

More prayers, or subjects for prayer are given. Elizabeth Goudge, a layperson who lived 1900 to 1984 has some of her prayers in this book “Give Us Grace:” “For the Crippled, For the Blind,” “For the Dying,” “For Political Prisoners,”

Frankly, I enjoy finding these prayers, and I think if you are so inclined to a need to get words to pray and connect with God on all sorts of topics, you will find this a treasure of such good things. A book to keep, the type is large enough for easy reading and the hardback binding seems sturdy. So one can put this book to use for a long time. One reviewer calls this book, a “Feast.” I think it is that, too. The publisher is Morehouse Publishing, an Episcopal Church publishing house. Interestingly, the genre or category for the book is “spirituality,” and that should tell you something of it, too. There is no harm in being introduced to a rich tradition. The book is compiled by a well known Episcopal editor, Christopher L. Webber. Congratulations to him for an eminent job. Rich in prayer, this book is a keeper for those so inclined to the spiritual path and religious reading.

–Peter Menkin, Mill Valley, CA USA This is a book that I read, but more I use for prayer. I grant many of the prayers by the well known and should be known Anglicans in this book are old. And their language may be unusual to us moderns, at least to an extent, but they are useful and meaningful.

I bought this hardback to have access to prayers. I had read a biography of Terry Waite, the Anglican held captive some years ago in Iran. He said of his captivity, that one thing that held him was staying with prayers he knew from his prayer book. Albeit I have The Book of Common Prayer, and I say those prayers from it as do many Episcopalians. I thought to myself that I needed more, and though I don’t believe that Terry Waite, a devout man, only said those prayers from his prayer book, and none of his own, nonetheless it is a good idea to have a source of prayer like the Anthology as also starting point and inspiration. Those who wish to widen their scope will find this a useful book, one full of history of the Anglican Church.

Say you are perusing the book, rather than reading it from one cover to the other, you will find all kinds of interesting prayers. Some are long. There is John Donne, who says prayers before various sacraments, like marriage. He is of course giving a sermon at the marriage. Here is some text to give you a taste of the language you may encounter. This from the time of 1571 to 1631:

“O Eternall and most gracious God, who hast promised to hearken to the prayers of thy people, when they pray towards thy house, though they be absent from it, worke more effectually upon us, who are personally met in this thy house, in this place consecrated to they worship. Enable us, O Lord so to see thee…”

The language is to this reader most moving and lovely. The book has many such samples of prayer. Here is another sample, this from Jeremy Taylor:

“An Act of Contrition…Lord, thou shalt find my heart full of cares and worldly desires, cheated with love of riches, and neglact of holy things…”

I was introduced to prayers from the New Zealand Prayer Book by a minister, and I was happy to find some of those prayers in this book, which Episcopalians may find a good source of history and interesting reading. There is a text before the prayers of each person who is quoted that tells of that persons life, and the years they lived. The quotes from the New Zealand book are too lengthy for here, but this excerpt about the night:

“The night is dark/Let our fears of the darkness of the world and of our own lives rest in you.” “The night is quiet./Let the quietness of your peace enfold us,/all dear to us,/and all who have no peace.”

That is a modern, contemporary prayer from their book.

More prayers, or subjects for prayer are given. Elizabeth Goudge, a layperson who lived 1900 to 1984 has some of her prayers in this book “Give Us Grace:” “For the Crippled, For the Blind,” “For the Dying,” “For Political Prisoners,”

Frankly, I enjoy finding these prayers, and I think if you are so inclined to a need to get words to pray and connect with God on all sorts of topics, you will find this a treasure of such good things. A book to keep, the type is large enough for easy reading and the hardback binding seems sturdy. So one can put this book to use for a long time. One reviewer calls this book, a “Feast.” I think it is that, too. The publisher is Morehouse Publishing, an Episcopal Church publishing house. Interestingly, the genre or category for the book is “spirituality,” and that should tell you something of it, too. There is no harm in being introduced to a rich tradition. The book is compiled by a well known Episcopal editor, Christopher L. Webber. Congratulations to him for an eminent job. Rich in prayer, this book is a keeper for those so inclined to the spiritual path and religious reading.

–Peter Menkin, Mill Valley, CA USA This is a book that I read, but more I use for prayer. I grant many of the prayers by the well known and should be known Anglicans in this book are old. And their language may be unusual to us moderns, at least to an extent, but they are useful and meaningful.

I bought this hardback to have access to prayers. I had read a biography of Terry Waite, the Anglican held captive some years ago in Iran. He said of his captivity, that one thing that held him was staying with prayers he knew from his prayer book. Albeit I have The Book of Common Prayer, and I say those prayers from it as do many Episcopalians. I thought to myself that I needed more, and though I don’t believe that Terry Waite, a devout man, only said those prayers from his prayer book, and none of his own, nonetheless it is a good idea to have a source of prayer like the Anthology as also starting point and inspiration. Those who wish to widen their scope will find this a useful book, one full of history of the Anglican Church.

Say you are perusing the book, rather than reading it from one cover to the other, you will find all kinds of interesting prayers. Some are long. There is John Donne, who says prayers before various sacraments, like marriage. He is of course giving a sermon at the marriage. Here is some text to give you a taste of the language you may encounter. This from the time of 1571 to 1631:

“O Eternall and most gracious God, who hast promised to hearken to the prayers of thy people, when they pray towards thy house, though they be absent from it, worke more effectually upon us, who are personally met in this thy house, in this place consecrated to they worship. Enable us, O Lord so to see thee…”

The language is to this reader most moving and lovely. The book has many such samples of prayer. Here is another sample, this from Jeremy Taylor:

“An Act of Contrition…Lord,

Is Your Church Social? Part 7: Facebook ? Give your church a Face lift

Is Your Church Social? Part 7: Facebook ? Give your church a Face lift

If you are a person (and most of us are) you can create a Facebook profile to reconnect with old friends, stay in touch with family and friends and meet new people online. Churches, on the other hand, cannot create a profile as profiles are restricted to individuals. Churches have to create a Facebook Page which works a little differently than a profile.

Your Church’s Facebook Page:
The Facebook Page for your church is a good way to get your church into the social networking scene. With Facebook being so popular, having your church where people are and having your church involved where your members and others are involved is a great way to connect with people.

The Facebook Page allows your church, as an organization, to have an official presence in Facebook, which is great for church marketing.

• The first step is to add a good profile picture. Many churches use a photo of their church building. That’s fine, but I’d encourage you to use pictures of people. People connect better with people than with buildings and after all, the church is the people, not the building.
• Next add the church’s contact information and some descriptive information about the church. If you have a church website, be sure to include the web address for the official church website.
• From there you can add whatever information/content you want. You can list events, publish photos and pictures, create discussion topics, and add notes.

Update, Update, Update:
Even more than with your church website, it is important to update your church’s Facebook Page. Most people on Facebook check Facebook a lot. Having new content on your church’s Facebook Page gives people a reason to check the page whenever they are on Facebook and that keeps them connected.

Updating the page doesn’t mean that you have to constantly be adding event or photos, it can simply be putting a message on the wall, perhaps a Bible verse or short “message of the day”. Also, unlike your church website, the adding of new content to the Facebook Page can be done by every member of your congregation. Encourage your congregation to write messages on the wall, post their own pictures and videos, and participate in discussions. The more interaction from your members, the better.

Be Personal:
Having your members posting on the church’s Facebook Page is not only helpful because it adds new content, but also because it makes the church more personal. Facebook is all about people connecting with people. Most of the communication that goes on in Facebook is about the little, personal things in people’s lives. People on Facebook are looking for that kind of personal information and interaction. By allowing the personal side of your church to come out on your Facebook Page, it makes the church more attractive to people, especially unchurched people who think the church is all about rules and religious practices.

Sending Updates
You can also use your church’s Facebook Page to communicate with fans (members of the church) that aren’t currently on the church’s Facebook Page using the Send an Update feature. This feature sends a message to the fan’s Facebook Profile. Sending updates can help send information to church members and also bring them back to the church’s Facebook Page. You can also use the Facebook Page to distribute blog articles, but I’ll discuss that in a future article.

Publicize Events
One other neat feature of the Facebook Page (and profiles) is that events can be made public. One of the options you will have when you setup an event in your church’s Facebook Page is to “Publicize” the event. By publicizing the event, it adds the event into the Facebook event database. People who are not fans (and fans too) who search through Facebook events will be able to find your church’s events. This is especially useful for events like concerts.

So, go ahead and get started. Create a new “Face” for your church. People are social. The church should be too.

Kurt Steinbrueck is the author of the Church Marketing Online blog. He has been providing Christian search engine optimization services for church marketing solutions and private school marketing. You can find the original article at http://churchmarketingonline.com.

Why won’t Obama give his blessing to the St Nicolas Church project at Ground Zero, does he dislike Santa Claus?

Question by Obama W. Bush: Why won’t Obama give his blessing to the St Nicolas Church project at Ground Zero, does he dislike Santa Claus?
There is something really strange about giving his blessing to the Cordoba Project. And rejecting the Church of St Nicolas

Best answer:

Answer by Trust Me!
Nothing strange about it at all, right up his muslim alley.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Did the Roman Catholic Church give us our Bible? (zkueker88)

Many Roman Catholics claim that the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) produced the Bible (God’s Word) to which they do not use very often… The truth is that the Roman Catholic Church did not give us our Bible. Rather, we got our Bible from the Holy Spirit through the apostles before the Catholic Church was romanized. Please see CARM www.carm.org