Tag Archives: Food

ShareHim Food Pantry, Homosassa, Florida

The Homosassa Florida, Seventh-day Adventist church recently completed a successful evangelistic campaign titled,”Hope for Tomorrow” using ShareHim sermon material and visuals. Earlier in the year a men’s group started a discussion on how to reach the local community. A number of ideas where considered and several were tried before arriving at the idea of opening a local food pantry. The church board approved the idea, and the pantry started operating two Tuesday afternoons a month. Through the “food Pantry” the church was getting to know their neighbors and making friends in the community. At the same time, an aggressive campaign was started, through newspaper advertising, offering a “Bible Correspondence Course”. The ShareHim sermons, visuals and program ideas helped bring this church family together and delivered a highly successful campaign to the community.

ShareHim Food Pantry, Homosassa, Florida

The Homosassa Florida, Seventh-day Adventist church recently completed a successful evangelistic campaign titled,”Hope for Tomorrow” using ShareHim sermon material and visuals. Earlier in the year a men’s group started a discussion on how to reach the local community. A number of ideas where considered and several were tried before arriving at the idea of opening a local food pantry. The church board approved the idea, and the pantry started operating two Tuesday afternoons a month. Through the “food Pantry” the church was getting to know their neighbors and making friends in the community. At the same time, an aggressive campaign was started, through newspaper advertising, offering a “Bible Correspondence Course”. The ShareHim sermons, visuals and program ideas helped bring this church family together and delivered a highly successful campaign to the community.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

Free Online Articles Directory

Why Submit Articles?
Top Authors
Top Articles
FAQ
AB Answers

Publish Article

0 && $.browser.msie ) {
var ie_version = parseInt($.browser.version);
if(ie_version Hello Guest
Login

Login via

Register
Hello
My Home
Sign Out

Email

Password


Remember me?
Lost Password?

Home Page > Relationships > Weddings > Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

Edit Article |

Posted: Dec 07, 2006 |Comments: 0
| Views: 1,021
|

Share

]]>

Syndicate this Article

Copy to clipboard

Wedding Music: the Food of Love?

By: Aidan Goldstraw

About the Author

Aidan Goldstraw is a freelance journalist and musician specialising in music for weddings, civil partnership ceremonies, parties and corporate events. A classically-trained pianist, you can hear samples of his piano playing at www.artofpiano.co.uk. Aidan is also the leader of jazz and blues function band Feels Like Midnight and is musical director at St Giles Parish Church, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, UK.

(ArticlesBase SC #79543)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/ – Wedding Music: the Food of Love?





Music is an essential ingredient of a memorable wedding day, so care is needed in deciding what role it will play on your big day.


CDs and discos are fine, but there’s no substitute for live music when it comes to providing a great wedding atmosphere.


Depending on where you’re getting married, there are three main areas where you need to consider what music and musicians you need – before, during and after the ceremony.


Civil weddings in secular locations are becoming more and more popular these days. However, you need to set a good atmosphere as family and friends gather ready for the wedding ceremony itself.


In churches it’s usually down to the resident organist to provide background music while the guests assemble. Of course, there’s no direct counterpart at a hotel or stately home, and this is one area where the presence of a good wedding pianist, for example, can really help.


Unlike the church setting, where pre-ceremony music is usually chosen (or sometimes improvised) by the organist, you’re likely to have more active input with the hired musician or musicians of your choice as to what material you’d like played.


Of course, the local church still remains a very popular choice for wedding ceremonies, so how should you handle the music here?


You should ideally ask the member of the clergy who is officiating at the ceremony to put you directly in touch with the organist. This will give you a chance to meet, listen to him or her play, and discuss choices of processional/recessional music and which hymns you would like sung.


You should pick music which is technically well within the capability of the designated organist – simpler music, well-played, is far better than having an inexperienced musician make an utter hash of something difficult.


When choosing hymns, it’s best to stick to the most popular ones unless a) you have paid for the church’s choir to sing at the ceremony and b) the choir itself is loud and musical – try attending morning service to guage their ability.


If neither applies, you’ll be relying on the congregation. Therefore, stick to familiar and easy-to-sing hymns that most people will know.


If you prefer to appoint an organist of your own for the ceremony most churches will allow you to do so, but some may insist that you also pay their regular organist fee as well.


Music for civil ceremonies usually has quite a different character – for a start there’ll be no hymns to worry about. But many ceremonies feature music for the entrance of the bride, the signing of the register and the newlyweds’ departure.


Piano music with a romantic theme can be used to full effect here and your pianist should have a broad range of possibilities from which to choose.


Many couples have “our tune”, a song or melody which has special significance for them and for their relationship, and a good wedding pianist should be able to handle most requests.


Bear in mind, though, that the instrument being used needs to be suited to the music in question – Deep Purple’s Smoke On The Water may be your all-time favourite tune, but it’ll sound rubbish played on a piano!


So now you’re hitched (good luck!) and have arrived at, or are already at, the venue for the wedding reception. What next, music-wise?


You may decide that a function band is ideal for the party after the ceremony – again, it’s up to you to decide the mood. A good rule of thumb is to be as inclusive as possible – you may be fans of heavy metal, but is that AC/DC tribute band really going to go down a treat with Auntie Flo?


Far better to aim slightly more middle of the road and use a band whose repertoire tries to offer something for everyone.


By far the biggest bone of contention surrounding most music at weddings is its volume. Remember that weddings are social occasions, so there’s little point in your guests not being able to hear themselves speak.


To be fair to bands, it’s worth pointing out that any group featuring a live drummer is going to be on the loud side, due to the nature of the instrument. Again, it’s possible to create quite a different mood with a solo wedding pianist playing favourite tunes into the night.


It’s important to consult any band or pianist in advance about the repertoire. While most musicians are happy to play a couple of particular favourites, given enough notice, wholesale customisation of their set list is probably something that won’t be possible without paying a significant additional fee.


When planning your schedule, you should allow enough time for the musicians to set up – usually about 30 minutes to an hour, depending on the size of the act – and enough physical space for them to play in. Consult with the act in question about this. Similarly, access to power points is an important matter to sort out – one plugboard run from a single socket is neither adequate nor safe!


The musicians will appreciate being looked after a little. You should supply some sort of changing room. It should be warm and ideally have washing facilities. Please note, toilets are not really acceptable as changing rooms!


While your wedding pianist or function band won’t necessarily expect the same food as you’re giving your guests, some light refreshment is very welcome. Most venues can usually arrange a few sandwiches for the band, providing you arrange it well before the date. At the very least, you should provide a supply of drinking water for use before, during and after the performance – making music is extremely thirsty work!


What about the cost? As a rule of thumb, most acts will charge an absolute minimum of 150UKP per musician, plus travel expenses. Remember, professional musicians pay tax on what they earn just like you. They work very unsocial hours and spend a great deal of time in rehearsal and money on expensive equipment.


You may be able to cut costs with cheaper acts, but largely speaking – as with all things in life – you get what you pay for. This is where listening to audio samples and demo discs is vital. It’s simple – good acts don’t come cheaply.


Choose wisely – and have a lovely day!

Retrieved from “http://www.articlesbase.com/weddings-articles/wedding-music-the-food-of-love-79543.html”

(ArticlesBase SC #79543)

Aidan Goldstraw
About the Author:

Aidan Goldstraw is a freelance journalist and musician specialising in music for weddings, civil partnership ceremonies, parties and corporate events. A classically-trained pianist, you can hear samples of his piano playing at www.artofpiano.co.uk. Aidan is also the leader of jazz and blues function band Feels Like Midnight and is musical director at St Giles Parish Church, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, UK.

]]>

Rate this Article

1
2
3
4
5

vote(s)
0 vote(s)

Feedback
RSS
Print
Email
Re-Publish

Source:  http://www.articlesbase.com/weddings-articles/wedding-music-the-food-of-love-79543.html

Article

Enjoy a travel to Leipzig: classical music, culture, shopping and good food

Enjoy a travel to Leipzig: classical music, culture, shopping and good food

 

 When planning a trip to Berlin, always consider short travels to beautiful destinations around. A visit in Potsdam is the traditional choice, but here is another great offer: Leipzig. Actually, why not both?

 

 In many ways, Berlin and Leipzig complement each other. When speaking about Leipzig, it is, first of all, its unique architecture, music, and shopping that make it attractive.

 

Like Berlin, Leipzig (pronounced ly’pe-tsig) is a city in East Germany, but in a different federal state, Saxony.

 

Most important tour sites are in the Leipzig’s center, and may be visited in one day. That means it’s possible to go there from Berlin and return to Berlin the same day. Going one way by train takes one hour and 20 minutes only.

 

 

Tourist Information Bureau in Leipzig is located near the main train station, and is open every day.

 

 If you plan to stay in Leipzig more than a day, go to the bureau and buy a “Leipzig Card” that gives you free travel on public transportation and discounts in most major city’s attractions. Three-day ticket price is 18.50 Euros per person, or 34 Euros for a couple with two children.

 

Boys who sing Bach

 

So what’s so special about Leipzig?

First of all, it’s the “City of Music”. Leipzig is regarded as the city of Johann Sebastian Bach. The great composer was not born in Leipzig, but definitely created his wonderful music there.

 

 Representing Bach more than anything else is Thomas Church, where he served as musical director and played the organ almost 30 years, until the day he died. The famous boys’ choir which he conducted, more than 250 years ago, sings Bach until now, in the same church. Listening to a concert of the choir, called in German “Thomanerchor”, is a wonderful experience for music lovers.

 

  Bach’s music is also played often elsewhere in Leipzig. For example, in the City’s Opera hall and in Bach’s Museum.

 

 

Musicians and museums

 

Speaking of classical music, Leipzig is not only the city of Bach. It is also the city of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, the great romantic composer. The house where he lived and died, at Goldschmidt Street 12, is now a museum honoring the composer and work.

 

 Another famous composer, Richard Wagner, was born in Leipzig, and the composer Robert Schumann lived there. Both are memorialized by museums as well.

 

Where do malls come from?

 

Besides music, what makes Leipzig unique is being a pioneer in commerce. The first shopping arcade in the world, known as Passage, was built in Leipzig in the beginning of the 20th century.

 

 The passage was actually the predecessor of the modern mall. Leipzig developed this kind of salesmanship into an art, and created an exclusive Passages’ architecture.

 

 At least a dozen of these elegant shopping centers is active there until today and worth visiting. Window shopping in the Passages is possible at any time, but if you really want to buy something do not go there Sundays, when most shops are closed.

 

Luther and Napoleon

 

 

Speaking of history and of Thomas Church (Thomaskirche, in German), this building was the place where Martin Luther, founder of the Reformation movement, addressed at Leipzig residents 1539 and convinced them into Protestantism.

 

In addition to the Thomas Church, the Nikolai (St Nicholas) Church is another tourists’ attraction. The church was the first base of the quiet protests in 1989, which ended in toppling the Berlin Wall.

 

10 minutes drive from the city center by tram (line 15) another historical site is located: the monument commemorating the defeat of Napoleon at the “Battle of Nations”, 1813. The German Kaiser Wilhelm the 2nd unveiled the huge monument, the largest in Europe, on the battle’s 100th anniversary.

 

 For a small entrance fee, you may climb to the top of the monument for observation. There is a museum as well.

 

A communist point of view

 

 The best view of Leipzig is available from the top of the tallest house in town, which is located in Augustus Square. The edifice is a remnant of the Communist spectacular building style. Today it is leased to the German Broadcasting Company MDR.

 

Leipzig was devastated by the allied bombings in World War II, and was not much of a city during the communist regime. However, since the re-unification of Germany, it has been renovated and restored.

 

 

Food and literature

 

 

In Leipzig center, there are an abundance of restaurants, pubs and bars. The food is good and the prices are not high. The most famous restaurant is “Auerbach’s cellar”, located in Grimmaische street 2.

 

 The place attracts many tourists, especially German literature lovers, because it is mentioned in Goethe’s play Faust. However, it serves a delicious traditional Saxon menu as well.

 

   In addition, there are a lot of greenery and water, a walking distance from midtown.

 

 A list of all beautiful places in Leipzig, many photos, and walking routes are to be found in my site www.berlinwalking.com.

 

 

 

 

Moshe Reinfeld is a veteran journalist and Travel expert.

Church outreach offers food to parents

Church outreach offers food to parents
Nicole Castaneda expressed her gratitude over and over as she talked about the bag of food she picked up Oct. 22 at Clayton Elementary School. The food distribution was an outreach project by Denver First Church of the Nazarene.
Read more on Englewood Herald

Charlotte Church – Charlotte Church No ‘feisty Simpleton’
Charlotte Church worries people see her as a “feisty, opinionated simpleton”.The Welsh former child star – once dubbed the ‘Voice Of An Angel’ – hopes to dispel…
Read more on ContactMusic

Church preaches starting pledge
Reading striker Simon Church will double his efforts to try and earn a place in Brian McDermott`s starting line-up.
Read more on PA Sport via Yahoo! UK & Ireland Sport

Church bazaar offers food and fun for everyone

Church bazaar offers food and fun for everyone
A few hundred people showed up Saturday at the North Orwell Community Hall to take advantage of the food, crafts and fun being offered at the North Orwell Union Church Holiday Bazaar.Among the wares offered by vendors were ceramics, knick-knacks, books,
Read more on The Daily & Sunday Review

Church mentors teens
Are you looking for a little guidance?The Rose of Sharon Missionary Baptist Church, 1615 E. Murphy, is starting a five-month high school mentoring program from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.The program, for teens ages 16 to 18, will help develop…
Read more on Odessa American

Church Got Lots of Empty Land? Build Housing.
On Monday, St. Martin’s Church at North Capitol and T Streets NE will officially open its new residential development, The Summit at St. Martin’s , with 178 units of affordable housing, 51 of them reserved for formerly homeless people who graduated from transitional housing programs.
Read more on Washington City Paper