Tag Archives: Fathers

Ancient Church Fathers: What the Disciples of the Apostles Taught

Ancient Church Fathers: What the Disciples of the Apostles Taught

The Ancient Church Fathers reveals the disciples of the twelve apostles, and what they taught, from their own writings. It documents that the same doctrine was faithfully transmitted to their descendants in the first few centuries. It also describes where, when, and by whom, the doctrines began to change. The ancient church fathers make it very easy to know for sure what the complete teachings of Jesus and the twelve apostles were. You will learn, from their own writings, what the first century disciples taught about the various doctrines that divide our church today. You will learn what was discussed at the Seven General Councils and why. You will learn about the cults and cult leaders who began to change doctrine and spread their heresy. And you will learn how those heresies became the standard teaching in the medieval church. A partial list of doctrines the ancient church discussed are: Abortion Animals sacrifices Antichrist Arminianism Bible or tradition Calvinism Circumcision Deity of Jesus Christ Demons Euthanasia Evolution False gospels False prophets Foreknowledge Free will Gnostic cults Homosexuality Idolatry Islam Israel’s return Jewish food laws Mary’s virginity Mary’s assumption Meditation The Nicolaitans Paganism Predestination premillennialism Purgatory Psychology Reincarnation Replacement theology Roman Catholicism The Sabbath Salvation Schism of Nepos Sin / Salvation The soul Spiritual gifts Transubstantiation Yoga Women in ministry This book is brought to you by Biblefacts Ministries, Biblefacts.org

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Karen Drucker song “Face of God” — Rev. Karen Lindvig Father’s Day Meditation — 6-19-2011

seattleunity.org — Karen Drucker sings her song “Face of God.” This leads into a Father’s Day meditation by Rev. Karen Lindvig. Accompanying her are Seattle Unity music director Erin McGaughan, John Stout, Olivia Hamilton, and David Loy, members of the Seattle Unity house band, and singers Becky Thatcher, Tam Katzin, and Beth Trachy. Rev. Karen Lindvig leads the Father’s Day meditation. Photos are shown of some fathers who have died are shown on the big screen. Erin McGaughan’s website is erinmcgaughan.com Kelly Gerling did the filming, editing, uploading. written descriptions, and annotating of these YouTube videos as a volunteer for the Seattle Unity Church. His websites are kellygerling.net http kellygerling.com http progressiverevolution.org
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Against the Pelagians (Orthodox Church Fathers)

Against the Pelagians (Orthodox Church Fathers)

On the Reading of Holy Books

C.S. Lewis’s “On the Reading of Old Books” is easily enough found on the web, and I will summarize its argument below before moving on. I would like to point out that he makes a secular argument for reading old books. I do not mean that this is a botched effort at making a religious argument, or that Lewis was not religious enough to make a religious argument. Sometimes people will deliberately make an argument that requires more modest assumptions, oftentimes much more modest assumptions, than what they actually believe, and this is usually a very carefully thought-out decision and need not be a shady move. But with all that said, the case he makes in “On the Reading of Old Books” is a secular argument in Church service, and I want to move on from it to a religious “On the Reading of Holy Books.”

On the Reading of Old Books

Experienced editors know the value of having another pair of eyes look over a manuscript; Lewis says that two heads are better than one, and we need a corrective to our blind spots. Not, necessarily, that old books have no blind spots. They have plenty of blind spots, just like we do. But they are not the same blind spots: their odd blind spots will not seem nearly as seductive to us, and they confront our own blind spots, blind spots they do not always share. If two heads are better than one, two heads will rarely point in the same wrong direction. This is not just a feature of the past; books from the future would work just as well, “but unfortunately we cannot get at them.” Lewis respects the humility of people who think it easier to read a modern explanation of Plato, but really, Plato is easier to understand in his own words. And, he argues, a broad exposure to Christian classics will lead to a recognition of “mere Christianity.”

On Holy Books in Particular

Meeting another culture in another time can help confront our blind spots, but patristic theology is not just another set of blind spots that helpfully clash with our own blind spots. The Bible first and foremost, Church Fathers old and new, the lives of the saints, the Liturgy—all of these are marked by the divine presence. Reading a secular classic may provide CULTURE shock. Reading a divine classic may provide CULTIC, worship shock. The latter is deeper and more interesting.

When they shock us and when they slowly reorient and cleanse us, when they fit into the living Tradition (a Tradition that is not inherited from our fathers, but borrowed from our children), provide something different from iron striking copper, or silver, or lead. The patristic image tells of iron that has been placed in the fire and taken on the fire’s nature of heat: creature takes on the characteristic of the Creator. It is perhaps fitting that the cover for this series show the words “ORTHODOX CHURCH FATHERS”, and show it in letters of iron taken into the nature of fire and glowing with red-hot heat.

Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward, also author, The Best of Jonathan’s Corner: An Anthology of Orthodox Christian TheologyOn the Reading of Holy Books

C.S. Lewis’s “On the Reading of Old Books” is easily enough found on the web, and I will summarize its argument below before moving on. I would like to point out that he makes a secular argument for reading old books. I do not mean that this is a botched effort at making a religious argument, or that Lewis was not religious enough to make a religious argument. Sometimes people will deliberately make an argument that requires more modest assumptions, oftentimes much more modest assumptions, than what they actually believe, and this is usually a very carefully thought-out decision and need not be a shady move. But with all that said, the case he makes in “On the Reading of Old Books” is a secular argument in Church service, and I want to move on from it to a religious “On the Reading of Holy Books.”

On the Reading of Old Books

Experienced editors know the value of having another pair of eyes look over a manuscript; Lewis says that two heads are better than one, and we need a corrective to our blind spots. Not, necessarily, that old books have no blind spots. They have plenty of blind spots, just like we do. But they are not the same blind spots: their odd blind spots will not seem nearly as seductive to us, and they confront our own blind spots, blind spots they do not always share. If two heads are better than one, two heads will rarely point in the same wrong direction. This is not just a feature of the past; books from the future would work just as well, “but unfortunately we cannot get at them.” Lewis respects the humility of people who think it easier to read a modern explanation of Plato, but really, Plato is easier to understand in his own words. And, he argues, a broad exposure to Christian classics will lead to a recognition of “mere Christianity.”

On Holy Books in Particular

Meeting another culture in another time can help confront our blind spots, but patristic theology is not just another set of blind spots that helpfully clash with our own blind spots. The Bible first and foremost, Church Fathers old and new, the lives of the saints, the Liturgy—all of these are marked by the divine presence. Reading a secular classic may provide CULTURE shock. Reading a divine classic may provide CULTIC, worship shock. The latter is deeper and more interesting.

When they shock us and when they slowly reorient and cleanse us, when they fit into the living Tradition (a Tradition that is not inherited from our fathers, but borrowed from our children), provide something different from iron striking copper, or silver, or lead. The patristic image tells of iron that has been placed in the fire and taken on the fire’s nature of heat: creature takes on the characteristic of the Creator. It is perhaps fitting that the cover for this series show the words “ORTHODOX CHURCH FATHERS”, and show it in letters of iron taken into the nature of fire and glowing with red-hot heat.

Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward, also author, The Best of Jonathan’s Corner: An Anthology of Orthodox Christian Theology

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Poplar Springs Kids – “My Father’s House”

To encourage children at Poplar Springs Baptist to join the youth choir, the director of the program asked me to create a music video that would generate excitement. She chose the music, and I directed it, but the children were actively involved with the wardrobe, the scenes, and supplying different elements for the shoot. Of course, their parents provided the feast – which we ALL enjoyed! Thanks to Rhonda Spence, who acted as Executive Producer.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The Early Church Fathers – Nicene & Post Nicene Fathers Volume 3: St. Augustine on The Holy Trinity, Doctrinal Treatises, Moral Treatises (The Early Church Fathers- Post Nicene)

The Early Church Fathers – Nicene & Post Nicene Fathers Volume 3: St. Augustine on The Holy Trinity, Doctrinal Treatises, Moral Treatises (The Early Church Fathers- Post Nicene)

Looking for the writings of the Early Church Fathers for your Kindle? You are in the right place!

You are about to purchase Nicene & Post Nicene Fathers Volume 3: St. Augustine on The Holy Trinity, Doctrinal Treatises, Moral Treatises by Philip Schaff. This collection is truly astonishing with thousands and thousands of pages of information! The Early Church Fathers is an EXHAUSTIVE study tool, used by countless scholars and laymen for well over 100 years.
Presented in 3 parts, this authoritative collection of writings by the Early Church Fathers is essential for understanding patristic thought, and is an invaluable tool to theology students everywhere.

This download contains:

Nicene & Post Nicene Fathers Volume 3: St. Augustine on The Holy Trinity, Doctrinal Treatises, Moral Treatises
This third volume contains the most important doctrinal and moral treatises of St. Augustin, and presents a pretty complete view of his dogmatics and ethics.

Don’t pass up this opportunity to obtain a copy of this invaluable Bible reference resource, and also check out the other Volumes available in the series as well (38 volumes total) Search the Kindle Store for “GraceWorks Multimedia” to download other available titles.This third volume contains the most important doctrinal and moral treatises of St. Augustin, and presents a pretty complete view of his dogmatics and ethics.

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What role did the church fathers play in the development of the Roman Catholic Church?

Question by opinionated: What role did the church fathers play in the development of the Roman Catholic Church?
What role did the church fathers play in the development of the Roman Catholic Church?

Best answer:

Answer by Matthew
Catholicism isn’t Christian. They worship the pope when they should be worshiping Jesus, man made rules, teach works for salvation, added books to the Bible, worship statues and loads of other idolatry. It can’t save. Only Jesus can. Please pray a sincere prayer with all of your heart admitting to Jesus you are a sinner. Have full faith that His blood pays off all of your sins and accept His gift of everlasting life. I pray that God blesses you with peace. Amen.

Give your answer to this question below!

The Fathers Speak: St Basil the Great, St Gregory of Nazianzus, St Gregory of Nyssa

The Fathers Speak: St Basil the Great, St Gregory of Nazianzus, St Gregory of Nyssa

As we, Christians of the twenty first century, study the Fathers of the Church, their writings (often in an unreadable English produced by clumsy translators) appear to us as foreboding, verbose, and somewhat closed within a world where theological contemplation replaces everyday reality. The Greek Fathers in particular have this reputation among students because they wrote relatively little about themselves, about the details of their own lives and the circumstances of daily life. Here for the first time is an anthology of texts gathered almost exclusively from the personal correspondence between St Basil the Great, his close friend Gregory “the Theologian” and his younger brother Gregory of Nyssa. These three men appear to us as real human beings, reveal the substance of their Christian vocation, uncover the program of their spiritual life, unveil the intellectual background of their use of Greek philosophy at the service of Christian theology, and explain the meaning of their ministry as monastic leaders and bishops of the Church. Readers of this book will be able to contemplate the icons of these Fathers in a new way, with a fuller understanding of the human reality which appears iconographically transfigured in frescoes and mosaics. For indeed, it is their genuinely human response to divine love and grace which has made them into “Holy Fathers,” into saints of the Church.

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