Tag Archives: facing

The nave (facing west) with late-15C brick clerestory and hammerbeam roof, All Saints Church, Hopton, Suffolk, England

The nave (facing west) with late-15C brick clerestory and hammerbeam roof, All Saints Church, Hopton, Suffolk, England
Chairs for church
Image by Hunky Punk
"The church has a well-proportioned interior. The nave is covered by a magnificent hammer beam and arch braced low pitched roof. The wooden carved figures with their ermine collars are holding symbols of the church’s worship and sacraments. These figures were re-painted by the daughters of Reverend Henry Downton in 1879, using boson’s chairs to reach such heights. Perhaps the carved figures represent local ‘townsmen’ who paid handsomely for such a fine clerestory using expensive Tudor brick. They fared better than the angels sitting on the wall post[s] which were mutilated and made headless in the Cromwellian period." –from the church guide booklet

The nave and chancel facing east, the Church of St Mary, Badley, Suffolk, England

The nave and chancel facing east, the Church of St Mary, Badley, Suffolk, England
Church furniture
Image by Hunky Punk
The furniture varies in age, but most of the pews benches and ends are of unstained weathered oak. The poppyhead bench ends are 15th C. "The roof is supported by king-posts which rest upon tiebeams. These may date back to the 14th century, as do several roofs in this part of Suffolk. The floor is paved with quarry tiles and numerous burial slabs." –The church guide (Roy Tricker, 1996)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Facing the Chancel, Trinity Church’s mural featuring figures of scriptual writers, was executed by John La Farge in 1877. It features St. Peter, St. Paul, Isaiah, Jeremiah, David and Moses. In only 5 months, an unknown at the time La Farge and his team executed 21,500 square feet of murals and decorative design. Trinity’s mural decoration is significant in that the art was not an afterthought, but was designed with input from the artist, architect, and client to seamlessly integrate with the architecture.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshiped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central tower, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Facing the Chancel, Trinity Church’s mural featuring figures of scriptual writers, was executed by John La Farge in 1877. It features St. Peter, St. Paul, Isaiah, Jeremiah, David and Moses. In only 5 months, an unknown at the time La Farge and his team executed 21,500 square feet of murals and decorative design. Trinity’s mural decoration is significant in that the art was not an afterthought, but was designed with input from the artist, architect, and client to seamlessly integrate with the architecture.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshiped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central tower, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Catholic church facing financial problems

Catholic church facing financial problems
A prominent Catholic church in Yuma is in deep financial trouble, but is in no danger of closing, according to its pastor and the Tucson Diocese.
Read more on The Yuma Sun

Belgian Cardinal admits sex abuse ‘errors’
The former head of Belgium’s Roman Catholic Church has admitted that failing to demand the resignation of bishop who had confessed to sexually abusing a nephew was a “serious error”.
Read more on Daily Telegraph

Mystery surrounds departed priest in Succasunna
ROXBURY TWP. – Longtime parishioners of St. Therese Roman Catholic Church in Succasunna were left reeling, and with very little information, following a blanket statement at Mass on Sunday, Aug. 22 informing them that a large sum of church money was missing, and that the matter was being investigated by authorities.
Read more on Roxbury Register