Tag Archives: East

All Saints Church – High Street East, Dorchester

All Saints Church – High Street East, Dorchester
Church list
Image by ell brown
Dorchester – the county town of Dorset. There has been a settlement here since Roman times. There was plenty of museums to visit, although we only went to a couple of them.

The High Street in Dorchester.

This is All Saints Church on High Street East in Dorchester. Grade II* listed.

Church of All Saints. Railings at West End, and Churchyard Steps at South East Corner of Church of a, Dorchester

In the entry for:-
1.
5191 HIGH EAST STREET
(South Side)

7/2 Church of All Saints. Railings
at west end, and churchyard
steps at south east corner of
Church of All Saints.
SY 6990 8.5.50
B

The Grade shall be amended to II*
————————————

HIGH EAST STREET
1.
5191
(South Side)
7/2 Church of All Saints. Railings
at west end, and churchyard
steps at south east comer of
Church of All Saints.
SY 6990 8.5.50
B

The Grade shall be amended to II*

————————————

HIGH EAST STREET
1.
5191
(South Side)
Church of All Saints.
Railings at west end,
and churchyard steps at
south east corner of
Church of All Saints.
SY 6990 7/2 8.5.50.
B
2.
1843-5. Architect: Benjamin Ferrey, assisted by A D H Acland-Troyte, who also
helped (physically) to build it. Hammer dressed limestone with ashlar Ham stone
dressings. Pitched stone slate roofs, with coped gables on kneelers. 4 bay
nave, 2 aisles, vestry, chancel and north west tower. Moulded plinth, string
below windows, carved ornament in eaves cornice. Buttresses. Windows with
reticulated tracery. Tower has deeply moulded and traceried bell openings.
Octagonal broach spire with 3 storeys of traceried lucarnes, each with its
gablet over. Deeply moulded and elaborately carved door in base of tower, with
crocketed gable and circle with inscribed trilobe in tympanum: the carving was
personally excuted by Acland-Troyte.
Interior has hammer-beam roof with elegant wind braces. Fine monument to Matthew
Chubb (16l7) in porch.
Ornamental iron railings and gates at west end, and lamp bracket at south east
corner lighting ashlar steps into churohyard.
All Saint’s Church and Nos 21 to 26 (consec) form a group with No 1 Cornhill.

Listing NGR: SY6934490733

Edinburgh. Saint Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, looking East

Edinburgh. Saint Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, looking East
Jesus Christ Church
Image by Cornell University Library
Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library
Accession Number: 15/5/3090.01245

Title: Edinburgh. Saint Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, looking East

Photographer: George Washington Wilson (Scottish, 1823-1893)
Architect: Sir George Gilbert Scott (English, 1811-1878)

Building Date: 1874-1879
Photograph date: ca. 1865-ca. 1885

Location: Europe: United Kingdom; Edinburgh

Materials: albumen print

Image: 11 5/8 x 7 5/8 in.; 29.5275 x 19.3675 cm

Style: Gothic Revival

Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White

Persistent URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5tdq

There are no known copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

The nave and chancel facing east, the Church of St Mary, Badley, Suffolk, England

The nave and chancel facing east, the Church of St Mary, Badley, Suffolk, England
Church furniture
Image by Hunky Punk
The furniture varies in age, but most of the pews benches and ends are of unstained weathered oak. The poppyhead bench ends are 15th C. "The roof is supported by king-posts which rest upon tiebeams. These may date back to the 14th century, as do several roofs in this part of Suffolk. The floor is paved with quarry tiles and numerous burial slabs." –The church guide (Roy Tricker, 1996)

St. Paul’s Anglican Church. Bloor Street, East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (1910)

St. Paul’s Anglican Church. Bloor Street, East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (1910)
St Church
Image by Toronto Public Library Special Collections
St. Paul’s Anglican Church. Bloor Street, East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Creator: Valentine-Black Co. Ltd
Date: 1910
Identifier:PC 254
Format: Postcard
Rights: Public domain
Courtesy: Toronto Public Library

You can order order a print or high-resolution copy.

First Baptist Church of East Nashville

First Baptist Church of East Nashville
List of churches
Image by SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent)
601 Main St., Listed on the National Register of Historical Places. Classical Revival architecture.

The church building was built in 1928 on the corner of Main and Sixth streets. It was expanded in 1931 and continuously improved, especially from 1934 through 1941. The front entrance of the church was restructured because of the widening of Main Street during the 1960s. Built in a Classical Revival design, this beautiful church building contains a magnificent pipe organ, melodic chimes, a mural by Tennessee State University professor and artist Frances Thompson, and memorial windows.

Photo: Church of the Covenant,310 East Forty-second Street,New York,New York County,NY

Photo: Church of the Covenant,310 East Forty-second Street,New York,New York County,NY

8×12 inch Photographic Print from a high-quality scan of the original.

Title: Church of the Covenant, 310 East Forty-second Street, New York, New York County, NY
Creator(s): Historic American Buildings Survey, creator
Date Created/Published: Documentation compiled after 1933
Data Page(s): 2
Photo Caption Page(s): 1
Notes:
Significance: Founded as a mission church in 1871 by members of the original Church of the Covenant on Park Avenue and 35th Street.
Survey number: HABS NY-6062
Place:
New York — New York County — New York
Latitude/Longitude: 40.71417, -74.00639
Bookmark /ny0935/

Note: Some images may have black bars on the sides or top if the original image does not conform to the 8×12 dimensions.

Combined Shipping: 1 shipping charge, no matter how many photos you order!

Source: Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

List Price: $ 8.99

Price: $ 8.99

Bridport United Church – East Street, Bridport – church sign

Bridport United Church – East Street, Bridport – church sign
Church list
Image by ell brown
The town of Bridport in Dorset – it is the gateway to West Bay and the Jurassic Coast.

This is Bridport United Church.

United Reformed & Methodist.

Grade II listed.

United Reformed and Methodist Church, Bridport

1.
5191 EAST STREET
(South Side)

United Reformed and
Methodist Church
SY 4692 1/262

II GV

2.
1859. Architects Poulton and Woodman of Reading. Hammer dreaded stone with
ashlar dressings. Pitched roof. Nave and 2 aisles. "W" front expresses this
by buttresses with setbacks crowned by octagonal spirelets with steep gablets
on each side. Coped gable end, crow-stepped at very top and crowned by tall
finial. Large 5-light grouped lancets, centre 3 lights grouped together under
1 arch and divided from remainder by colonnettes: reticulated tracery hood
mould. Pointed arch in gable end with Geometrical tracery. Porch t? each
aisle with very steep roof, coped gable ends and finials, diagonally planked
double doors with ornamental iron hinges, in cusped pointed arches with hood
moulds. Star-shaped windows above each porch. Side elevations have 6 lancets
with shaped arches, separated by buttresses.
Interior. Open hammerbeam timber roof on foliate corbels. Galleries round
3 sides on twisted iron columns. Rib-vaulted apse approached through arch
on shafts with elaborate foliate capitals, corbelled out fron wall; "O Worship
the Lord in the Beauty of Holiness" painted round extrados. Gabled and crocketed
organ in apse. Panelled pulpit. Early C17 polygonal pulpit with 2 tiers
of arcading, originally in the church at Charmouth. It was from this pulpit
that the Vicar of Charmouth (John Wesley’s great-grandfather) was preaching
while the fugitive Charles II was waiting for the ship which failed to take
him into exile in 1651.

Nos 8 to 36 (even) form a group with the United Reformed and Methodist Church.

Listing NGR: SY4675792863

Church sign.

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, a beautiful but plain looking Georgian style structure is the second oldest church building in Manhattan, dating back to the 18th century. Constructed of schist, a dull grey stone, readily available from the bedrock of Manhattan, kept building costs down eliminating the need for quarried stone.

In 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, Governor of New Amsterdam, purchased land for a bowery or farm from the Dutch West India Company and by 1660 built a family chapel at the present day site of St. Marks Church. Stuyvesant died in 1678 and was interred in a vault under the chapel. Stuyvesant’s great-grandson, Petrus, would donate the chapel property to Episcopal Church in 1793, stipulating that a new chapel be erected and in 1795 the cornerstone of the present day St. Mark’s Church was laid. The church was completed and consecrated in 1799. And Alexander Hamilton would then provide legal aid in incorporating St. Mark’s Church as the first Episcopal Parish independent of Trinity Church in the new world.

In 1828, the church steeple and Greek revival clock tower, designed by Ithiel Town, of Town and Thompson, was erected. In 1835, the two-story fieldstone Sunday School was completed and in 1838, St. Mark’s Church established the Parish Infant School for poor children. In 1854, the Italian cast iron porch with ionic columns and a simple balustrade,completed the church. In 1861, St. Mark’s Church commissioned a brick addition to the Sunday School, the present day Parish Hall, designed and supervised by architect James Renwick Jr, who designed Grace Church and would go onto building St. Patrick’s Cathedral. In 1900, leading architect Ernest Flagg designed the rectory.

On July 27, 1978, a fire nearly destroyed St. Mark’s Church. The Citizens to Save St Mark’s was founded to raise funds for its reconstruction and the Preservation Youth Project undertakes the reconstruction supervised by architects Harold Edleman and craftspeople provided by preservation contractor I. Maas & Sons. The Landmark Fund emerged from the Citizens to Save St Mark’s and continues to exist to help maintain and preserve St. Mark’s Church for future generations.

St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery is hallowed ground not only for Episcopalians, but devotees of avant-garde arts as well. Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham danced here in the 20s and 30s, and the cutting-edge Danspace Project, founded in 1974, continues that legacy with a full schedule of performances in the airy, open main hall. Literature has been just as revered: The late, great Allen Ginsberg was a recurring participant in the church’s resident Poetry Project (a nationally recognized force). Furthermore, St. Mark’s has been a happy home for legendary experimental theater auteur Richard Foreman. The space has so thoroughly established itself as an essential component of the arts community that it’s easy to forget that this is still a functioning church

St. Marks Churchyard houses many burial vaults. The West Yard is known as the Healing Garden, providing an oasis from city life. Some of the ancient maples in the yard were lost to the Asian Longhorn Beetle in 2000. This area was a proposed (and rejected) site for two 18-story apartment towers designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. Among the famous buried here are Daniel Tompkins, who abolished slavery in New York; Commodore Matthew Perry, who forced Japan to accept U.S. trade; New York Mayor Philip Hone; and Peter Stuyvesant. Department store pioneer A.T. Stewart, whose store filled the block between 9th and 10th streets east of Broadway, was buried here in 1876, but on November 6, 1878, his body was snatched and held for 0,000 ransom. The widow eventually regained possession of the corpse in 1881, after bargaining the kidnappers down to ,000. He now rests elsewhere.

Saint Mark’s-in-the-Bowery Church was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966.

National Register #72000885 (1972)

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church

NYC – East Village: St Marks-in-the-Bowery Church
St Church
Image by wallyg
St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, a beautiful but plain looking Georgian style structure is the second oldest church building in Manhattan, dating back to the 18th century. Constructed of schist, a dull grey stone, readily available from the bedrock of Manhattan, kept building costs down eliminating the need for quarried stone.

In 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, Governor of New Amsterdam, purchased land for a bowery or farm from the Dutch West India Company and by 1660 built a family chapel at the present day site of St. Marks Church. Stuyvesant died in 1678 and was interred in a vault under the chapel. Stuyvesant’s great-grandson, Petrus, would donate the chapel property to Episcopal Church in 1793, stipulating that a new chapel be erected and in 1795 the cornerstone of the present day St. Mark’s Church was laid. The church was completed and consecrated in 1799. And Alexander Hamilton would then provide legal aid in incorporating St. Mark’s Church as the first Episcopal Parish independent of Trinity Church in the new world.

In 1828, the church steeple and Greek revival clock tower, designed by Ithiel Town, of Town and Thompson, was erected. In 1835, the two-story fieldstone Sunday School was completed and in 1838, St. Mark’s Church established the Parish Infant School for poor children. In 1854, the Italian cast iron porch with ionic columns and a simple balustrade,completed the church. In 1861, St. Mark’s Church commissioned a brick addition to the Sunday School, the present day Parish Hall, designed and supervised by architect James Renwick Jr, who designed Grace Church and would go onto building St. Patrick’s Cathedral. In 1900, leading architect Ernest Flagg designed the rectory.

On July 27, 1978, a fire nearly destroyed St. Mark’s Church. The Citizens to Save St Mark’s was founded to raise funds for its reconstruction and the Preservation Youth Project undertakes the reconstruction supervised by architects Harold Edleman and craftspeople provided by preservation contractor I. Maas & Sons. The Landmark Fund emerged from the Citizens to Save St Mark’s and continues to exist to help maintain and preserve St. Mark’s Church for future generations.

St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery is hallowed ground not only for Episcopalians, but devotees of avant-garde arts as well. Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham danced here in the 20s and 30s, and the cutting-edge Danspace Project, founded in 1974, continues that legacy with a full schedule of performances in the airy, open main hall. Literature has been just as revered: The late, great Allen Ginsberg was a recurring participant in the church’s resident Poetry Project (a nationally recognized force). Furthermore, St. Mark’s has been a happy home for legendary experimental theater auteur Richard Foreman. The space has so thoroughly established itself as an essential component of the arts community that it’s easy to forget that this is still a functioning church

St. Marks Churchyard houses many burial vaults. The West Yard is known as the Healing Garden, providing an oasis from city life. Some of the ancient maples in the yard were lost to the Asian Longhorn Beetle in 2000. This area was a proposed (and rejected) site for two 18-story apartment towers designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. Among the famous buried here are Daniel Tompkins, who abolished slavery in New York; Commodore Matthew Perry, who forced Japan to accept U.S. trade; New York Mayor Philip Hone; and Peter Stuyvesant. Department store pioneer A.T. Stewart, whose store filled the block between 9th and 10th streets east of Broadway, was buried here in 1876, but on November 6, 1878, his body was snatched and held for 0,000 ransom. The widow eventually regained possession of the corpse in 1881, after bargaining the kidnappers down to ,000. He now rests elsewhere.

Saint Mark’s-in-the-Bowery Church was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966.

National Register #72000885 (1972)