Tag Archives: City

New York City Church of Christ Gospel Choir New Jersey Region Performance

Gospel Showcase at Newark Symphony Hall featuring the New York City Church of Christ Gospel Choir / New Jersey Region on Dec. 11th, 2011.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

City Methodist Church 1571

City Methodist Church 1571
Church websites
Image by Michael Kappel
City Methodist Church Urban decay.
This huge gothic church was built in Gary Indiana in 1925. This decaying methodist church opened in 1926 and was closed in 1980.
Photographed by Michael Kappel on Sunday September 16th 2012 after being abandoned for 32 years.

Gary Indiana was founded in 1906 and its largest employer was US Steel.
Population declined after the decline of US Steel and large sections of the city are
abandoned. On April 28, 2009 Gary Methodist Church is featured in the episode "Outbreak" on "Life After People" as an example of what cities may look like 30 years after people.

577 Washington St
Gary, IN US
United States of America

Photo taken my Michael Kappel on a tour guided by Rick Drew
View the high resolution image on my Photo website
Pictures.MichaelKappel.com

Philadelphia – Old City: Christ Church Cemetery

Philadelphia – Old City: Christ Church Cemetery
Christ Church
Image by wallyg
Christ Church Burial Ground, at the southeast corner of 5th Street and Arch Street, is the final resting place of 4,000 members of the Anglican Christ Church including many Colonial, Revolutionary and Post-Revolutionary notables. In 1719, Christ Church purchased the two acres of land on the outskirts of town, and it has been used as an active graveyard ever since. The brick wall was first built in 1772, and later re-built in 1927 with much of the original masonry and capstone

In the early 1800s, twenty family vaults were built in the middle of the burial ground along a path from the 5th street gate. These family vaults were built to extend down 36 feet and contain up to 20 family members in each. Many of Philadelphia’s prominent families used these vaults up into the 20th century.

In 1864, the Church warden, Edward Lyon Clark compiled a book of all the inscriptions that were still visible on the fading soft marble markers. Today only 1,300 markers remain and plaques have been placed in front of some of the gravestones that contain the words that once appeared on the now blank headstones.

Among Christ Church Burial Ground’s famous residents are five signers of the Declaration of Independence–Benjamin Franklin, Joseph Hewes, Francis Hopkinson, George Ross, and Dr. Benjamin Rush; Commodore William Bainbridge, Dr. Thomas Bond, Elizabeth and Samuel Powel, Dr. Philip Syng Physick, Commodore William Bainbridge, and James Biddle.

Christ Church Burial Ground National Register #71000062

Church of the Transfiguration~Little Church Around the Corner ~ New York City NY

Church of the Transfiguration~Little Church Around the Corner ~ New York City NY
List of churches
Image by Onasill ~ New Lay Out/Huge Mistake
The Church of the Transfiguration, also known as the Little Church Around the Corner, is an Episcopal parish church located at 1 West 29th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. he congregation was founded in 1848 by the Rev. Dr. George Hendric Houghton, and worshipped in a home at 48 East 29th Street until the church was built and consecrated in 1849.
The church was designed in the early English Neo-Gothic style; the architech has not been identified.[2] The sanctuary is set back from the street behind a garden which creates a facsimile of the English countryside which has long been an oasis for New Yorkers of all faiths who relax in the garden, pray in the chapel or enjoy free weekday concerts in the main church. The complex has grown somewhat haphazardly over the years, and for this it is sometimes called the "Holy Cucumber Vine."[3] The sanctuary had a guildhall, transepts and a tower added to it in 1852, and the lych-gate, designed by Frederick C. Withers, was built in 1896. Chapels were added in 1906 (lady chapel) and 1908 (mortuary chapel).
In 1967, the Church was designated a New York City landmarks,[2] and in 1973 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
NRHP#73001216
NYC Landmark