Tag Archives: Charleston

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Church pews
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

he original organ, made by John Snetzler in London, was installed in 1768. The case, which was altered several times, was refinished and restored to its original configuration in 1994 by Kenneth Jones of Bray, Ireland. Jones built a new 40-stop, 51-rank tracker organ to fit in and behind the Snetzler case. St. Michael’s had one of the first choirs of surpliced boys in this county. The Vestry records mention them as early as 1794.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

Does the Charleston Community Church in Charleston,Ore.;have a web site?

Question by cheslatta: Does the Charleston Community Church in Charleston,Ore.;have a web site?
I am a former church member as a child , and I miss all the church fellowship.

Best answer:

Answer by LorBe
I don’t believe they do…WOW some of my acquantances went there a few yrs. back….

Give your answer to this question below!

What is a good non-denominational church near north charleston, SC?

Question by blah: What is a good non-denominational church near north charleston, SC?
I have been re stationed in charleston, and am looking for a good non-denominational church to attend. Our last one (in GA) had a very up beat almost rock style of worship (not heavy metal) and we loved it. We would love to find one like that, however I understand that there is more to church than worship. Please help.

Best answer:

Answer by Iason Ouabache
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=non-denominational+church+near+north+charleston%2C+SC

What do you think? Answer below!

Does the Charleston Community Church in Charleston,Ore.;have a web site?

Question by cheslatta: Does the Charleston Community Church in Charleston,Ore.;have a web site?
I am a former church member as a child , and I miss all the church fellowship.

Best answer:

Answer by George H
think so

Give your answer to this question below!

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church
Episcopal Church
Image by wallyg
St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, located at 146 Church Street, houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina, formed by Charles Town colonists in 1681, and was the first Anglican church established south of Virginia. The current church building, located at 146 Church Street, was built from 1835-1836 by Joseph Hyde, with its steeple added from 1848-1850 by Edward Brickell White. The first St. Philip’s was a small wooden building, constructed in 1681 on the present day site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. After it was destroyed by a hurricane in 1710, it was replaced by a new brick building on the current site in 1723 that burned down in 1835.

The stuccoed brick church features an imposing tower designed in the Wren-Gibbs tradition. Like the earlier incarnation, and following the contemporary practice of English parish churches, it extends into the center of Church Street, with three separate Tuscan pedimented porticoes on each of its facades. Hyde also added interior Roman columns and entablatures, high Corinthian arcades and a chancel. The chancel was damaged during the Civil War, when the St. Philip’s steeple was used for siting during Union bombardment of the city. Bells that were once encased in the steeple were melted for a Confederate canyon.

National Register #73001695 (1973)

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church
Episcopal Church
Image by wallyg
St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, located at 146 Church Street, houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina, formed by Charles Town colonists in 1681, and was the first Anglican church established south of Virginia. The current church building, located at 146 Church Street, was built from 1835-1836 by Joseph Hyde, with its steeple added from 1848-1850 by Edward Brickell White. The first St. Philip’s was a small wooden building, constructed in 1681 on the present day site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. After it was destroyed by a hurricane in 1710, it was replaced by a new brick building on the current site in 1723 that burned down in 1835.

The stuccoed brick church features an imposing tower designed in the Wren-Gibbs tradition. Like the earlier incarnation, and following the contemporary practice of English parish churches, it extends into the center of Church Street, with three separate Tuscan pedimented porticoes on each of its facades. Hyde also added interior Roman columns and entablatures, high Corinthian arcades and a chancel. The chancel was damaged during the Civil War, when the St. Philip’s steeple was used for siting during Union bombardment of the city. Bells that were once encased in the steeple were melted for a Confederate canyon.

National Register #73001695 (1973)

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church

Charleston – South of Calhoun: St. Michael’s Church
Chairs for church
Image by wallyg
St. Michael’s Church, located at 80 Meeting Street at the "Four Corners of the Law", was built between 1752 and 1761 on the site of the original St. Philip’s church house built in 1681 and subsequently damaged by a 1710 hurricane and rebuilt several blocks away. In 1751, the St Philips congregation split, and the residents of the lower half of the city formed St. Michael’s.

During the Revolutionary period, St. Michael’s quickly became the city’s focal point of Colonial resistance. The church tower, a target for ship gunners, was painted black but that made it more visible against the blue sky. Its lead roof was melted down for bullets, and the steeple functioned as a navigational landmark and observation post.

It is not known who is responsible for the two-story stuccoed brick Georgian style edifice, but the two-story portico facing Broad Street —a replicate dating from the late 1880’s of the original, which was damaged in an 1886 earthquake—was the first of its size in Colonial America and features Tuscan columns. The steeple rises 186-feet in height, with a 7½-foot weather vein.

The interior still retains its traditional 18th century design, with a three-sided second story gallery and native cedar box-pews, including Number 43, known as The Governor’s Pew, which was used by George Washington on May 8, 1791 and General Robert E. Lee in 1861. The original pulpit is remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. The Victorian Altar was presented in 1892 as a memorial.

The chancel decoration, executed by Tiffany in 1905, is a half-come design surrounded by ten small Corinthian columns also dating from 1905. The chancel window, installed as a memorial in 1893, shows St. Michael’ casting out the dragon, after Raphael’s painting. The chancel chairs were purchased by the Vestry in 1817. The chancel rail of wrought iron, dating from 1772, is a fine example of English hand work of the period. It was the first important piece of wrought iron to be imported to Charleston.

The clock and eight bells bells, originally imported from England in 1764, were taken back there as a prize of war during the Revolutionary War, but purchased and returned by a London merchant. During the Civil War, they were sent to Columbia, where they were cracked in a fire in 1865. Salvaged, the metal fragments were sent to England where they were recast in their original moulds and eventually rehung.

National Register #66000704 (1966)

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church

Charleston – French Quarter: Saint Philips Episcopal Church
Episcopal Church
Image by wallyg
St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, located at 146 Church Street, houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina, formed by Charles Town colonists in 1681, and was the first Anglican church established south of Virginia. The current church building, located at 146 Church Street, was built from 1835-1836 by Joseph Hyde, with its steeple added from 1848-1850 by Edward Brickell White. The first St. Philip’s was a small wooden building, constructed in 1681 on the present day site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. After it was destroyed by a hurricane in 1710, it was replaced by a new brick building on the current site in 1723 that burned down in 1835.

The stuccoed brick church features an imposing tower designed in the Wren-Gibbs tradition. Like the earlier incarnation, and following the contemporary practice of English parish churches, it extends into the center of Church Street, with three separate Tuscan pedimented porticoes on each of its facades. Hyde also added interior Roman columns and entablatures, high Corinthian arcades and a chancel. The chancel was damaged during the Civil War, when the St. Philip’s steeple was used for siting during Union bombardment of the city. Bells that were once encased in the steeple were melted for a Confederate canyon.

National Register #73001695 (1973)

Go To Team in Charleston Adds Full-time High Definition Editor, Updates High Definition Edit Suite


Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) March 23, 2007

Go To Team announced today that Ryan Cockrell has joined the company as the new High Definition Video Editor for the Charleston-based production company.

As High Definition Video Editor, Cockrell will work with clients to craft entertaining and effective finished video products.

Having worked freelance for Go To Team the past eight years, Cockrell says, “The Go To Team makes great TV, that’s where I belong. It’s my family. We always have the best people and equipment – the best attitude and the most fun. I like being a part of that.”

Along with bringing Cockrell on board Go To Team spent over ,000 completely updating their Charleston Edit Suite to accommodate High Definition video. The room now has 4 HD Monitors, DVC Pro HD Deck, and the ability to edit video footage shot on the company’s 4 High Definition Cameras.

Operations Manager, Shawn Moffatt sees real value in the new upgrades. “The upgraded suite is the premier High Definition Edit Suite in South Carolina. Its technology and layout make it a unique environment for Ryan and clients to be creative. Clients can even view live edit sessions from anywhere in the world through our new video server.”

Cockrell has worked in film and video professionally since 1999. Upon graduating from the Honors College at the University of South Carolina, Cockrell moved to San Diego where he began freelancing in the production community for Entertainment Tonight, Extra, and Oprah Winfrey. Shortly after wrapping a movie entitled, The Forsaken, Cockrell came home to South Carolina.

In his first two years back he worked as editor and audio engineer for ABC News, NBC News, The Food Network, The Discovery Channel, The Travel Channel and Trinity Church. For the past two years, Cockrell has worked primarily for NBC News on the Today Show, Nightly News and Dateline. Highlights include complete 2004 election coverage and a trip to Rome to cover the funeral of Pope John Paul II live from Vatican Square.

As lead Editor, Cockrell received an award in 2006 from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons for a DVD production detailing the hip surface replacement techniques of pioneer surgeon Thomas P. Gross M.D.

Although the majority of Cockrell’s credits are from major networks, during down time he works on skateboard video projects in South Carolina, Arizona, California and up and down the entire East Coast. He is the Director of a non-profit association, PourItNow.com which is devoted to creating public skate parks throughout South Carolina.

Go To Team staffs camera crews in Charlotte, NC; Charleston, SC; Columbia, SC; and Raleigh, NC. Their equipment includes Panasonic Varicam high definition camera packages, Sony Betacam packages, and a high definition edit suite. To schedule the Charleston, South Carolina Edit Suite, please contact Go To Team, 843-884-6222.

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