Tag Archives: Boston

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

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Trinity Church, Boston

Trinity Church, Boston
Trinity Church
Image by Cornell University Library
Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library
Accession Number: 15/5/3090.00239

Title: Trinity Church, Boston

Architect: Henry Hobson Richardson (American, 1838-1886)

Building Date: 1872-1877
Photograph date: ca. 1877-ca. 1895

Location: North and Central America: United States; Massachusetts, Boston

Materials: albumen print

Style: Romanesque Revival

Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White

Persistent URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5sdp

There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Facing the Chancel, Trinity Church’s mural featuring figures of scriptual writers, was executed by John La Farge in 1877. It features St. Peter, St. Paul, Isaiah, Jeremiah, David and Moses. In only 5 months, an unknown at the time La Farge and his team executed 21,500 square feet of murals and decorative design. Trinity’s mural decoration is significant in that the art was not an afterthought, but was designed with input from the artist, architect, and client to seamlessly integrate with the architecture.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshiped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central tower, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Trinity Church’s stained glass collection is one of the finest in the nation with examples from most of the major American and European stained glass stuios of the nineteenth century. With the exception of one window, the church contained only clear glass windows at tits consecration. Twenty four figurative windows followed within five years. Today thirty-six windows line the walls of Trinity church, including four designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris and another four designed by John La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Stained Glass Window
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
Trinity Church’s stained glass collection is one of the finest in the nation with examples from most of the major American and European stained glass stuios of the nineteenth century. With the exception of one window, the church contained only clear glass windows at tits consecration. Twenty four figurative windows followed within five years. Today thirty-six windows line the walls of Trinity church, including four designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris and another four designed by John La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)