Tag Archives: Boston

Going to Boston for the first time what sights should I see?

Question by princesscutesmile: Going to Boston for the first time what sights should I see?
Hi,

My sister and I will be visitng Boston for the first time together at the end of the month. We are planning to visit The new england aquarium, Fenway park, Trinity church, Acorn st, and the skyway observatory. Are these places worth the visit?

Where else should we go?? Where can we go for great food?

Any recommendations would be great!!

Maggie

Best answer:

Answer by potatochip
Last time we went to Boston we visited Plymouth Rock and the mock up of the Mayflower. Also saw the SS Constitution which is at a harbor about 10 miles from the airport.

The first time I went, I also went to Newbury Street. It was too cold to walk on the path Paul Revere rode to warn that the British were coming.

As for food, try Legal Seafood. They have a really good New England clam chowder.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Mandatory Volunteering? Boston News Report on the International Church of Christ -ICOC- BCOC- (1998)

NewsCenter 5 Report on The Boston HOPE. The Boston HOPE part of the HOPE Wordwide. It’s the covering organization of BCOC – ICOC Boston HOPE organisation inf…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Facing the Chancel
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Facing the Chancel, Trinity Church’s mural featuring figures of scriptual writers, was executed by John La Farge in 1877. It features St. Peter, St. Paul, Isaiah, Jeremiah, David and Moses. In only 5 months, an unknown at the time La Farge and his team executed 21,500 square feet of murals and decorative design. Trinity’s mural decoration is significant in that the art was not an afterthought, but was designed with input from the artist, architect, and client to seamlessly integrate with the architecture.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshiped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central tower, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: New Old South Church

Boston – Back Bay: New Old South Church
Old Church
Image by wallyg
The Old South Church in Boston, also known as the New Old South Church or Third Church, located at 645 Boylston Street on Copley Square, was built in 1874 to the Venetian Gothic design of Charles Amos Cummings and Willard Thomas Sears. The church building is one of the most significant examples of the impact on American architecture by British culutral theorist and archiectural critic John Ruskin.

This United Church of Christ (Congregational) meeting house is home to one of the older religious communities in the United States, organized by dissenters from Boston’s First Church in 1669, and from that time known as the Third Church in Boston. The congregation first met in their 1670 Cedar Meeting House, and then at the Old South Meeting House. Members of the congregation have included Samuel Adams, , William Dawes, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Sewall, and Phillis Wheatley. In 1773, Samuel Adams gave the signals from the Old South Meeting House for the "war whoops" that started the Boston Tea Party. During the Unitarian Movement of the early 19th cenutry, Old South was the sole Congregational Church in Boston to Adhere to the doctrine of Trinitarianism. In 1816 Old South Church joined with Park Street Church to form the City Mission Society, a social justice society to serve Boston’s urban poor. During the American Civil War, Old South became a recruiting center for the Union Army under minister Jacob Manning.

Construction of the new church began in 1872. The exterior is built primarily of Roxbury conglomerate, or puddingstone, with ornamention of striped arches, tracery, and ironwork. The trademark campanile, or tower, rises to a height of 246-feet and houses the church’s 2,020-pound bell. Designed by Allen and Collens in the 1930’s, it replaced the original tower which had begun to list and had to be dismantled. Centered above the Sanctuary on the east side is a copper the latern, a copper clad cuploa surrounded by twelve ornate gothic arched windows. The interior is of plaster with Italian cherry woodwork. The screen of wooden arches behind the choir was adapted from the Doge’s Palace in Venice. Stained glass windows are by Clayton and Bell of London in 15th century English style.

Old South Church National Register #70000690 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Emmanuel Episcopal Church

Boston – Back Bay: Emmanuel Episcopal Church
Church Episcopal
Image by wallyg
Emmanuel Episcopal Church, at 15 Newbury Street, was constructed in 1861 to the design of Alexander Rice Etsy. It was the first building completed on Newbury Street. The congregation was founded in 1860 as part of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. In 1899, Frederic Crowninshield designed its sanctuary’s centerpiece window, in which Piety points the way to Emmanuel’s Land. The Leslie Lindsey Memorial Chapel, consecrated in 1924, is considered one of the architectural gems of Boston.