Tag Archives: altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar

Boston – Back Bay: Trinity Church – Chancel and Altar
Trinity Church
Image by wallyg
The chancel and altar at Trinity Church, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and Timothy Walsh in 1938, are backed by a series of seven stained glass windows and seven gilded marble bas-relief panels. The panels, executed by Ernest Pellegrini, depict from left to right: Phillips Brooks, John Wesley, John Wycliffe, St. Francis, St. Augustine, St. Athanasius and St. Paul. The stained glass windows, by Clayton and Bell, from left to right, are: The Nativity, Jesus in the Temple with the Doctors, The Baptism, The Preacher, The Last Supper, The Resurrection and The commission to the Apostles.

Trinity Church, at 206 Clarendon Street, was built from 1873 to 1876 by Henry Hobson Richardson. The Episcopal parish, founded in 1733, originally worshipped on Summer Street until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1872. Under the direction of Rector Phillips Brooks, Hobson was commissioned to design a replacement in Copley Square. Trinity Church helped establish Richardson’s reputation, becoming the birthplace and archetype of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by a clay roof, polychromy, rough stone, heavy arches, and a massive tower.

The building’s plan is a modified Greek Cross with four arms extending outwards from the central towner, which stands 211 ft tall. Situated in Copley Square, which was originally a mud flat, Trinity rests on some 4500 wooden piles, each driven through 30 feet of gravel fill, silt, and clay, and constantly wetted by a pump so they do not rot if exposed to air.

Its interior murals, which cover over 21,500 square feet were completed entirely by American artists. Richardson and Brooks decided that a richly colored interior was essential and turned to an at the time unknown John La Farge. The Church’s windows were originally clear glass at consecration but later adorned. Four windows were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris. Another four windows were done by La Farge, who used a revolutionary style of layering opalescent glass.

In 2007, Trinity Church was ranked #25 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

Trinity Church National Register #70000733 (1970)

The Altar of the Chair

The Altar of the Chair
Chairs for church
Image by Lawrence OP
"[St Peter] chosen by Christ as "rock" on which to build the Church (cf. Matthew 16:18), began his ministry in Jerusalem, after the ascension of the Lord and Pentecost. The first "seat" of the Church was the Cenacle, and in all probability in that room, where Mary, the Mother of Jesus, also prayed with the disciples, a special place was reserved for Simon Peter.

Subsequently, the see of Peter was Antioch, a city situated on the Oronte River in Syria, today Turkey, which at the time was the third metropolis of the Roman Empire after Rome and Alexandria in Egypt. Of that city, evangelized by Barnabas and Paul, where "for the first time the disciples were called Christians" (Acts 11:26), Peter was the first Bishop.

In fact, the Roman Martyrology, before the reform of the calendar, established also a specific celebration of the Chair of Peter at Antioch. From there, Providence led Peter to Rome, where he concluded with martyrdom his course of service to the Gospel. For this reason, the See of Rome, which had received the greatest honor, received also the task entrusted by Christ to Peter of being at the service of all the local Churches for the building and unity of the whole People of God.

In this way the See of Rome came to be known as that of the Successor of Peter, and the "cathedra" of its Bishop represented that of the apostle charged by Christ to feed all his flock. It is attested by the most ancient Fathers of the Church, as for example St. Irenaeus, bishop of Lyon, who in his treatise "Against Heresies" describes the Church of Rome as "greatest and most ancient, known by all; … founded and constituted at Rome by the two glorious Apostles Peter and Paul"; and he adds: "With this Church, because of her outstanding superiority, the universal Church must be in agreement, that is, the faithful everywhere" (III, 3, 2-3).

Tertullian, for his part, affirms: "How blessed this Church of Rome is! The Apostles themselves shed on her, with their blood, the whole of the doctrine" ("La Prescrizione degli Eretici," 36). The Chair of the Bishop of Rome represents, therefore, not only his service to the Roman community, but also his mission of guide of the whole People of God.

To celebrate the "Chair" of Peter, as we do today, means, therefore, to attribute to it a strong spiritual significance and to recognize in it a privileged sign of the love of God, good and eternal Shepherd, who wants to gather the whole of his Church and guide her along the way of salvation".

– Pope Benedict XVI.