Tag Archives: Against

Against the Pelagians (Orthodox Church Fathers)

Against the Pelagians (Orthodox Church Fathers)

On the Reading of Holy Books

C.S. Lewis’s “On the Reading of Old Books” is easily enough found on the web, and I will summarize its argument below before moving on. I would like to point out that he makes a secular argument for reading old books. I do not mean that this is a botched effort at making a religious argument, or that Lewis was not religious enough to make a religious argument. Sometimes people will deliberately make an argument that requires more modest assumptions, oftentimes much more modest assumptions, than what they actually believe, and this is usually a very carefully thought-out decision and need not be a shady move. But with all that said, the case he makes in “On the Reading of Old Books” is a secular argument in Church service, and I want to move on from it to a religious “On the Reading of Holy Books.”

On the Reading of Old Books

Experienced editors know the value of having another pair of eyes look over a manuscript; Lewis says that two heads are better than one, and we need a corrective to our blind spots. Not, necessarily, that old books have no blind spots. They have plenty of blind spots, just like we do. But they are not the same blind spots: their odd blind spots will not seem nearly as seductive to us, and they confront our own blind spots, blind spots they do not always share. If two heads are better than one, two heads will rarely point in the same wrong direction. This is not just a feature of the past; books from the future would work just as well, “but unfortunately we cannot get at them.” Lewis respects the humility of people who think it easier to read a modern explanation of Plato, but really, Plato is easier to understand in his own words. And, he argues, a broad exposure to Christian classics will lead to a recognition of “mere Christianity.”

On Holy Books in Particular

Meeting another culture in another time can help confront our blind spots, but patristic theology is not just another set of blind spots that helpfully clash with our own blind spots. The Bible first and foremost, Church Fathers old and new, the lives of the saints, the Liturgy—all of these are marked by the divine presence. Reading a secular classic may provide CULTURE shock. Reading a divine classic may provide CULTIC, worship shock. The latter is deeper and more interesting.

When they shock us and when they slowly reorient and cleanse us, when they fit into the living Tradition (a Tradition that is not inherited from our fathers, but borrowed from our children), provide something different from iron striking copper, or silver, or lead. The patristic image tells of iron that has been placed in the fire and taken on the fire’s nature of heat: creature takes on the characteristic of the Creator. It is perhaps fitting that the cover for this series show the words “ORTHODOX CHURCH FATHERS”, and show it in letters of iron taken into the nature of fire and glowing with red-hot heat.

Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward, also author, The Best of Jonathan’s Corner: An Anthology of Orthodox Christian TheologyOn the Reading of Holy Books

C.S. Lewis’s “On the Reading of Old Books” is easily enough found on the web, and I will summarize its argument below before moving on. I would like to point out that he makes a secular argument for reading old books. I do not mean that this is a botched effort at making a religious argument, or that Lewis was not religious enough to make a religious argument. Sometimes people will deliberately make an argument that requires more modest assumptions, oftentimes much more modest assumptions, than what they actually believe, and this is usually a very carefully thought-out decision and need not be a shady move. But with all that said, the case he makes in “On the Reading of Old Books” is a secular argument in Church service, and I want to move on from it to a religious “On the Reading of Holy Books.”

On the Reading of Old Books

Experienced editors know the value of having another pair of eyes look over a manuscript; Lewis says that two heads are better than one, and we need a corrective to our blind spots. Not, necessarily, that old books have no blind spots. They have plenty of blind spots, just like we do. But they are not the same blind spots: their odd blind spots will not seem nearly as seductive to us, and they confront our own blind spots, blind spots they do not always share. If two heads are better than one, two heads will rarely point in the same wrong direction. This is not just a feature of the past; books from the future would work just as well, “but unfortunately we cannot get at them.” Lewis respects the humility of people who think it easier to read a modern explanation of Plato, but really, Plato is easier to understand in his own words. And, he argues, a broad exposure to Christian classics will lead to a recognition of “mere Christianity.”

On Holy Books in Particular

Meeting another culture in another time can help confront our blind spots, but patristic theology is not just another set of blind spots that helpfully clash with our own blind spots. The Bible first and foremost, Church Fathers old and new, the lives of the saints, the Liturgy—all of these are marked by the divine presence. Reading a secular classic may provide CULTURE shock. Reading a divine classic may provide CULTIC, worship shock. The latter is deeper and more interesting.

When they shock us and when they slowly reorient and cleanse us, when they fit into the living Tradition (a Tradition that is not inherited from our fathers, but borrowed from our children), provide something different from iron striking copper, or silver, or lead. The patristic image tells of iron that has been placed in the fire and taken on the fire’s nature of heat: creature takes on the characteristic of the Creator. It is perhaps fitting that the cover for this series show the words “ORTHODOX CHURCH FATHERS”, and show it in letters of iron taken into the nature of fire and glowing with red-hot heat.

Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward, also author, The Best of Jonathan’s Corner: An Anthology of Orthodox Christian Theology

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Protest against the Church of Scientology

Protest against the Church of Scientology
Church abuse
Image by Fibonacci Blue
Anonymous protest against the Church of Scientology

May 8, 2010

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Internet based Anonymous people protested outside the Minneapolis Church of Scientology against the abuses reported by ex-members including: dividing families, harassing critics, litigious harassment of ex-members. Scientology has a history of attacking or taking legal action against critics, so protesters typically wear masks for anonymity.

Fibonacci Blue 2010-05-08

Protest against the Church of Scientology

Protest against the Church of Scientology
Church abuse
Image by Fibonacci Blue
Anonymous protest against the Church of Scientology

May 8, 2010

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Internet based Anonymous people protested outside the Minneapolis Church of Scientology against the abuses reported by ex-members including: dividing families, harassing critics, litigious harassment of ex-members. Scientology has a history of attacking or taking legal action against critics, so protesters typically wear masks for anonymity.

Fibonacci Blue 2010-05-08

Red Ice radio – 31.8.2011 – The Crimes Against Humanity by Church and State

Kevin Annett – The Crimes Against Humanity by Church and State August 31, 2011 Kevin D. Annett is a Canadian writer and former minister of the United Church of Canada. Annett graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology and a Master’s Degree in Political Science. Annett has written two books on the subject of residential school abuse in Canada. In 2006 Kevin produced a documentary on this topic called “Unrepentant”. Additionally, he created and hosted “Hidden from History”, a public affairs and human rights program on Vancouver Cooperative Radio from 2001 until the station shut him down in 2010. Kevin returns to the program for an update on the world-wide system of abuse by church and state upon children and adults. We discuss the tribunal he is involved in and his recent trip to England and consequent arrest. Then, Kevin talks about the cannon law of the Roman Catholic Church, which is as the heart of child trafficking, abuse and genocide of indigenous people around the world. Topics Discussed: priests, public servants, Scotland’s Holly Greig case, Protestant, Anglican, Lutheran, Baptist, the Roman Catholic system, papal bulls, Queen of England, child abuse, tribunal, Vatican, Jesuits, Knights of Malta, money, property and wealth of the church, child trafficking, Roman Catholic church as a political organization.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Protest against the Church of Scientology

Protest against the Church of Scientology
Church abuse
Image by Fibonacci Blue
Anonymous protest against the Church of Scientology

May 8, 2010

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Internet based Anonymous people protested outside the Minneapolis Church of Scientology against the abuses reported by ex-members including: dividing families, harassing critics, litigious harassment of ex-members. Scientology has a history of attacking or taking legal action against critics, so protesters typically wear masks for anonymity.

Fibonacci Blue 2010-05-08

Sin against the Innocents: Sexual Abuse by Priests and the Role of the Catholic Church (Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality)

Sin against the Innocents: Sexual Abuse by Priests and the Role of the Catholic Church (Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality)

Experts from a variety of fields join forces to show us what fuels a most horrific violation of trust–sexual abuse by priests–and how the church and church structure play a role in this abuse. This riveting work includes chapters by a former Director of the premiere U.S. facility treating clergy who are sexual offenders, by a Jesuit psychologist who authored the largest study of clergy sexual abusers ever completed, and from a Vatican correspondent explaining the issues as seen by the Vatican. This text also includes an opening chapter by Michael Rezendes, a Boston Globe investigative reporter and member of the Spotlight Team that won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking the story of sexual abuse by clergy. A statement by the Executive Director of SNAP, the national support group for victims of clergy sexual abuse, is also included.Experts from a variety of fields join forces to show us what fuels a most horrific violation of trust–sexual abuse by priests–and how the church and church structure play a role in this abuse. This riveting work includes chapters by a former Director of the premiere U.S. facility treating clergy who are sexual offenders, by a Jesuit psychologist who authored the largest study of clergy sexual abusers ever completed, and from a Vatican correspondent explaining the issues as seen by the Vatican. This text also includes an opening chapter by Michael Rezendes, a Boston Globe investigative reporter and member of the Spotlight Team that won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking the story of sexual abuse by clergy. A statement by the Executive Director of SNAP, the national support group for victims of clergy sexual abuse, is also included.

List Price: $ 43.95

Price: $ 43.95